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Acupuncture treatment for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial with six months follow-up.

Zhang SP, Yip TP, Li QS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Secondary outcome measures included a VAS for activity pain, overall pain rating as well as pressure pain threshold using algometry.Significant differences in reduction in pain scores, favoring the treatment group, were seen at one month for morning pain (22.6 ± 4.0 versus 12.0 ± 3.0, mean ± SEM), overall pain (20.3 ± 3.7 versus 9.5 ± 3.6) and pressure pain threshold (145.5 ± 32.9 versus -15.5 ± 39.4).No serious adverse event was observed in either group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. It has been suggested that some acupoints have a specific effect on heel pain. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and specificity of acupuncture treatment for plantar fasciitis. Subjects were randomly assigned to the treatment group (n = 28) or control group (n = 25). The treatment group received needling at the acupoint PC 7, which is purported to have a specific effect for heel pain. The control group received needling at the acupoint Hegu (LI 4), which has analgesic properties. Treatment was administered five times a week for 2 weeks, with an identical method of manual needling applied to the two acupoints. The primary outcome measure was morning pain on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) at one month post-treatment. Secondary outcome measures included a VAS for activity pain, overall pain rating as well as pressure pain threshold using algometry. Significant differences in reduction in pain scores, favoring the treatment group, were seen at one month for morning pain (22.6 ± 4.0 versus 12.0 ± 3.0, mean ± SEM), overall pain (20.3 ± 3.7 versus 9.5 ± 3.6) and pressure pain threshold (145.5 ± 32.9 versus -15.5 ± 39.4). No serious adverse event was observed in either group. The results indicate that acupuncture can provide pain relief to patient with plantar fasciitis, and that PC 7 is a relatively specific acupoint for heel pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histograms showing mean changes of morning pain, activity pain, overall pain and algometric pain threshold from the baseline in the specific acupoint group (PC7, n = 28) and the non-specific acupoint group (LI4, n = 25). Number of feet in algometric measurement: PC7, n = 43; LI4, n = 38. *P < .05.
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fig3: Histograms showing mean changes of morning pain, activity pain, overall pain and algometric pain threshold from the baseline in the specific acupoint group (PC7, n = 28) and the non-specific acupoint group (LI4, n = 25). Number of feet in algometric measurement: PC7, n = 43; LI4, n = 38. *P < .05.

Mentions: Of primary interest is whether there was any difference in the improvements between the PC7 and LI4 groups. Using a multivariate general linear model in the SPSS software with baseline values as covariate and applying Bonferroni correction, significant differences were detected at one month for morning pain (P = .044), overall pain (P = .049) and pressure pain threshold (P = .007), favoring the PC7 group. Difference in activity pain was also observed at 6 months (P = .048; Figure 2). The differences in improvements of outcome measures between the two groups are also summarized in Figure 3 to illustrate the effect size of treatment.


Acupuncture treatment for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial with six months follow-up.

Zhang SP, Yip TP, Li QS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Histograms showing mean changes of morning pain, activity pain, overall pain and algometric pain threshold from the baseline in the specific acupoint group (PC7, n = 28) and the non-specific acupoint group (LI4, n = 25). Number of feet in algometric measurement: PC7, n = 43; LI4, n = 38. *P < .05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094706&req=5

fig3: Histograms showing mean changes of morning pain, activity pain, overall pain and algometric pain threshold from the baseline in the specific acupoint group (PC7, n = 28) and the non-specific acupoint group (LI4, n = 25). Number of feet in algometric measurement: PC7, n = 43; LI4, n = 38. *P < .05.
Mentions: Of primary interest is whether there was any difference in the improvements between the PC7 and LI4 groups. Using a multivariate general linear model in the SPSS software with baseline values as covariate and applying Bonferroni correction, significant differences were detected at one month for morning pain (P = .044), overall pain (P = .049) and pressure pain threshold (P = .007), favoring the PC7 group. Difference in activity pain was also observed at 6 months (P = .048; Figure 2). The differences in improvements of outcome measures between the two groups are also summarized in Figure 3 to illustrate the effect size of treatment.

Bottom Line: Secondary outcome measures included a VAS for activity pain, overall pain rating as well as pressure pain threshold using algometry.Significant differences in reduction in pain scores, favoring the treatment group, were seen at one month for morning pain (22.6 ± 4.0 versus 12.0 ± 3.0, mean ± SEM), overall pain (20.3 ± 3.7 versus 9.5 ± 3.6) and pressure pain threshold (145.5 ± 32.9 versus -15.5 ± 39.4).No serious adverse event was observed in either group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. It has been suggested that some acupoints have a specific effect on heel pain. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and specificity of acupuncture treatment for plantar fasciitis. Subjects were randomly assigned to the treatment group (n = 28) or control group (n = 25). The treatment group received needling at the acupoint PC 7, which is purported to have a specific effect for heel pain. The control group received needling at the acupoint Hegu (LI 4), which has analgesic properties. Treatment was administered five times a week for 2 weeks, with an identical method of manual needling applied to the two acupoints. The primary outcome measure was morning pain on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) at one month post-treatment. Secondary outcome measures included a VAS for activity pain, overall pain rating as well as pressure pain threshold using algometry. Significant differences in reduction in pain scores, favoring the treatment group, were seen at one month for morning pain (22.6 ± 4.0 versus 12.0 ± 3.0, mean ± SEM), overall pain (20.3 ± 3.7 versus 9.5 ± 3.6) and pressure pain threshold (145.5 ± 32.9 versus -15.5 ± 39.4). No serious adverse event was observed in either group. The results indicate that acupuncture can provide pain relief to patient with plantar fasciitis, and that PC 7 is a relatively specific acupoint for heel pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus