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Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

Rustagi T, Rangasamy P, Versland M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2011)

Bottom Line: The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC.On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC.In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Conn., USA.

ABSTRACT
Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showing a 5.4 × 3.3 cm mass at the junction of the second and third part of the duodenum: axial view (a) and sagittal view (b). The mass is noted to be adjacent but not involving the head of the pancreas. No evidence of hepatic or visceral metastasis is seen and no lymphadenopathy is noted.
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Figure 2: Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showing a 5.4 × 3.3 cm mass at the junction of the second and third part of the duodenum: axial view (a) and sagittal view (b). The mass is noted to be adjacent but not involving the head of the pancreas. No evidence of hepatic or visceral metastasis is seen and no lymphadenopathy is noted.

Mentions: Further investigations included a computed tomography scan of the abdomen which showed an ill-defined mass measuring 5.4 × 3.3 cm at the junction of the second and third portion of the duodenum, adjacent to but not involving the head of the pancreas (fig. 2). There was no evidence of liver or visceral metastasis, and the visceral vessels and lymph nodes appeared normal. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed normal pancreaticobiliary system with no common bile duct dilatation suggestive of obstruction.


Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

Rustagi T, Rangasamy P, Versland M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2011)

Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showing a 5.4 × 3.3 cm mass at the junction of the second and third part of the duodenum: axial view (a) and sagittal view (b). The mass is noted to be adjacent but not involving the head of the pancreas. No evidence of hepatic or visceral metastasis is seen and no lymphadenopathy is noted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094685&req=5

Figure 2: Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showing a 5.4 × 3.3 cm mass at the junction of the second and third part of the duodenum: axial view (a) and sagittal view (b). The mass is noted to be adjacent but not involving the head of the pancreas. No evidence of hepatic or visceral metastasis is seen and no lymphadenopathy is noted.
Mentions: Further investigations included a computed tomography scan of the abdomen which showed an ill-defined mass measuring 5.4 × 3.3 cm at the junction of the second and third portion of the duodenum, adjacent to but not involving the head of the pancreas (fig. 2). There was no evidence of liver or visceral metastasis, and the visceral vessels and lymph nodes appeared normal. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed normal pancreaticobiliary system with no common bile duct dilatation suggestive of obstruction.

Bottom Line: The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC.On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC.In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Conn., USA.

ABSTRACT
Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus