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Effectiveness of an educational and physical program in reducing accompanying symptoms in subjects with head and neck pain: a workplace controlled trial.

Rota E, Evangelista A, Ciccone G, Ferrero L, Ugolini A, Milani C, Ceccarelli M, Galassi C, Mongini F - J Headache Pain (2011)

Bottom Line: After 12 months, the pooled estimation did not show any significant difference of symptom prevalence between groups (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.00).In conclusion, this is the first longitudinal study relative to accompanying symptoms.Its results suggest the effectiveness of this cognitive program in reducing the burden of physical and psychiatric complaints in a large, working population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Headache-Facial Pain, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, 14 Corso Dogliotti, 10126, Turin, Italy. eugenia_rota@yahoo.it

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational and physical program in reducing behavioral or somatic symptoms along with headache, neck and shoulder pain in a working community. A controlled, non-randomized trial was carried out in a working community and 384 employees were enrolled and divided into a study group (Group 1) and a control group (Group 2). The Group 1 received a physical and educational intervention, consisting of relaxation and posture exercises and the use of visual feedback. After 6 months, the intervention was administered to the Group 2. Both groups were then followed for an additional 6 months until the end of the trial. The presence of accompanying symptoms was investigated with a semi-structured interview using a checklist of 20 items, along with headache, neck, and shoulder pain parameters and the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression, in three clinical examinations at baseline, after 6 months and after 12 months. For each symptom, as well as the presence of any type of symptom, the differences between groups in the prevalence at the clinical examinations following the baseline were evaluated by applying logistic models. After 6 months, the probability of the presence of any type of symptom was significantly lower in the Group 1 (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.85) with respect to the Group 2. After 12 months, the pooled estimation did not show any significant difference of symptom prevalence between groups (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.00). In conclusion, this is the first longitudinal study relative to accompanying symptoms. Its results suggest the effectiveness of this cognitive program in reducing the burden of physical and psychiatric complaints in a large, working population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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Fig1: Flow chart

Mentions: The design of this controlled, non-randomized trial has been extensively described in previous reports [14, 15] and is summarized in the flowchart (Fig. 1). The protocol was assessed and approved by the Institutional Review Board of the San Giovanni Battista Hospital of the city of Turin. Eligible participants included 661 employees of the City of Turin’s registry and tax offices as of 1 January 2005. Specifically, participants included 330 subjects from the central registry office (Group 1) and 331 at the peripheral registry offices and the tax office (Group 2). Informed consent was given by 192 and 192 subjects, respectively. No exclusion criteria were applied. Participants recorded daily pain episodes in diaries. After a 2-month period (March and April 2005), a first clinical examination (clinical examination 1, baseline) was carried out, and Group 1 received a physical and educational intervention consisting of a relaxation exercise performed once or twice a day, three posture exercises performed briefly every 2–3 h, and the use of visual feedback to monitor excessive contraction of the head and neck muscles. These instructions were reiterated to Group 1 again after 2 and 4 months. After 6 months (the eighth month since the beginning of the study), a second clinical examination (clinical examination 2) was performed for all subjects. The same physical and educational program was then administered to Group 2. Both groups continued to perform the exercises and fill out their diaries for months 9–14. A final clinical examination (clinical examination 3) was performed at the end of the 14th month of follow-up. A small number of participants were lost at the follow-up in both groups (35 drop-outs in Group 1, 28 in Group 2).Fig. 1


Effectiveness of an educational and physical program in reducing accompanying symptoms in subjects with head and neck pain: a workplace controlled trial.

Rota E, Evangelista A, Ciccone G, Ferrero L, Ugolini A, Milani C, Ceccarelli M, Galassi C, Mongini F - J Headache Pain (2011)

Flow chart
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094669&req=5

Fig1: Flow chart
Mentions: The design of this controlled, non-randomized trial has been extensively described in previous reports [14, 15] and is summarized in the flowchart (Fig. 1). The protocol was assessed and approved by the Institutional Review Board of the San Giovanni Battista Hospital of the city of Turin. Eligible participants included 661 employees of the City of Turin’s registry and tax offices as of 1 January 2005. Specifically, participants included 330 subjects from the central registry office (Group 1) and 331 at the peripheral registry offices and the tax office (Group 2). Informed consent was given by 192 and 192 subjects, respectively. No exclusion criteria were applied. Participants recorded daily pain episodes in diaries. After a 2-month period (March and April 2005), a first clinical examination (clinical examination 1, baseline) was carried out, and Group 1 received a physical and educational intervention consisting of a relaxation exercise performed once or twice a day, three posture exercises performed briefly every 2–3 h, and the use of visual feedback to monitor excessive contraction of the head and neck muscles. These instructions were reiterated to Group 1 again after 2 and 4 months. After 6 months (the eighth month since the beginning of the study), a second clinical examination (clinical examination 2) was performed for all subjects. The same physical and educational program was then administered to Group 2. Both groups continued to perform the exercises and fill out their diaries for months 9–14. A final clinical examination (clinical examination 3) was performed at the end of the 14th month of follow-up. A small number of participants were lost at the follow-up in both groups (35 drop-outs in Group 1, 28 in Group 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: After 12 months, the pooled estimation did not show any significant difference of symptom prevalence between groups (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.00).In conclusion, this is the first longitudinal study relative to accompanying symptoms.Its results suggest the effectiveness of this cognitive program in reducing the burden of physical and psychiatric complaints in a large, working population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Headache-Facial Pain, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, 14 Corso Dogliotti, 10126, Turin, Italy. eugenia_rota@yahoo.it

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational and physical program in reducing behavioral or somatic symptoms along with headache, neck and shoulder pain in a working community. A controlled, non-randomized trial was carried out in a working community and 384 employees were enrolled and divided into a study group (Group 1) and a control group (Group 2). The Group 1 received a physical and educational intervention, consisting of relaxation and posture exercises and the use of visual feedback. After 6 months, the intervention was administered to the Group 2. Both groups were then followed for an additional 6 months until the end of the trial. The presence of accompanying symptoms was investigated with a semi-structured interview using a checklist of 20 items, along with headache, neck, and shoulder pain parameters and the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression, in three clinical examinations at baseline, after 6 months and after 12 months. For each symptom, as well as the presence of any type of symptom, the differences between groups in the prevalence at the clinical examinations following the baseline were evaluated by applying logistic models. After 6 months, the probability of the presence of any type of symptom was significantly lower in the Group 1 (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.85) with respect to the Group 2. After 12 months, the pooled estimation did not show any significant difference of symptom prevalence between groups (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.00). In conclusion, this is the first longitudinal study relative to accompanying symptoms. Its results suggest the effectiveness of this cognitive program in reducing the burden of physical and psychiatric complaints in a large, working population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus