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One year outcomes of a mentoring scheme for female academics: a pilot study at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London.

Dutta R, Hawkes SL, Kuipers E, Guest D, Fear NT, Iversen AC - BMC Med Educ (2011)

Bottom Line: Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment), self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year.Work-family conflict can also diminish.Despite these gains, mentees' prior expectations were shown to be unrealistically high, but mentors' expectations were exceeded.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, Department of Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: The professional development of under-represented faculty may be enhanced by mentorship, but we understand very little about the mechanisms by which mentoring brings about change. Our study posed the research question, what are the mechanisms by which mentoring may support professional development in under-represented groups? The study aims to: (i) to pilot a mentoring scheme for female academics; (ii) to compare various health-related and attitudinal measures in mentees at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year into the mentoring relationship and, (iii) to compare pre-mentoring expectations to outcomes at 6 months and 1 year follow-up for mentees and mentors.

Methods: Female academic mentees were matched 1:1 or 2:1 with more senior academic mentors. Online surveys were conducted to compare health-related and attitudinal measures and expectations of mentoring at baseline with outcomes at 6 months and 1 year using paired t-tests and McNemar's test for matched cohort data.

Results: N = 46 mentoring pairs, 44 (96%) mentees completed the pre-mentoring survey, 37 (80%) at 6 months and 30 (65%) at 1 year. Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment), self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year. Highest expectations were career progression (39; 89%), increased confidence (38; 87%), development of networking skills (33; 75%), better time-management (29; 66%) and better work-life balance (28; 64%). For mentees, expectations at baseline were higher than perceived achievements at 6 months or 1 year follow-up. For mentors (N = 39), 36 (92%) completed the pre-mentoring survey, 32 (82%) at 6 months and 28 (72%) at 1 year. Mentors' highest expectations were of satisfaction in seeing people progress (26; 69%), seeing junior staff develop and grow (19; 53%), helping solve problems (18; 50%), helping women advance their careers (18; 50%) and helping remove career obstacles (13; 36%). Overall, gains at 6 months and 1 year exceeded pre-mentoring expectations.

Conclusions: This uncontrolled pilot study suggests that mentoring can improve aspects of job-related well-being, self-esteem and self-efficacy over 6 months, with further improvements seen after 1 year for female academics. Work-family conflict can also diminish. Despite these gains, mentees' prior expectations were shown to be unrealistically high, but mentors' expectations were exceeded.

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Flow diagram of online survey completion by Mentees and Mentors. †n = 37 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 29 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys *7 Mentors had 2 mentees each; n = 28 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 24 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys.
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Figure 1: Flow diagram of online survey completion by Mentees and Mentors. †n = 37 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 29 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys *7 Mentors had 2 mentees each; n = 28 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 24 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys.

Mentions: A total of 46 mentoring pairs were formed; 7 mentors had 2 mentees each (Figure 1).


One year outcomes of a mentoring scheme for female academics: a pilot study at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London.

Dutta R, Hawkes SL, Kuipers E, Guest D, Fear NT, Iversen AC - BMC Med Educ (2011)

Flow diagram of online survey completion by Mentees and Mentors. †n = 37 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 29 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys *7 Mentors had 2 mentees each; n = 28 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 24 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094330&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of online survey completion by Mentees and Mentors. †n = 37 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 29 Mentees undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys *7 Mentors had 2 mentees each; n = 28 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 6 month online surveys; n = 24 Mentors undertook both pre-mentoring & 1 year surveys.
Mentions: A total of 46 mentoring pairs were formed; 7 mentors had 2 mentees each (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment), self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year.Work-family conflict can also diminish.Despite these gains, mentees' prior expectations were shown to be unrealistically high, but mentors' expectations were exceeded.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, Department of Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: The professional development of under-represented faculty may be enhanced by mentorship, but we understand very little about the mechanisms by which mentoring brings about change. Our study posed the research question, what are the mechanisms by which mentoring may support professional development in under-represented groups? The study aims to: (i) to pilot a mentoring scheme for female academics; (ii) to compare various health-related and attitudinal measures in mentees at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year into the mentoring relationship and, (iii) to compare pre-mentoring expectations to outcomes at 6 months and 1 year follow-up for mentees and mentors.

Methods: Female academic mentees were matched 1:1 or 2:1 with more senior academic mentors. Online surveys were conducted to compare health-related and attitudinal measures and expectations of mentoring at baseline with outcomes at 6 months and 1 year using paired t-tests and McNemar's test for matched cohort data.

Results: N = 46 mentoring pairs, 44 (96%) mentees completed the pre-mentoring survey, 37 (80%) at 6 months and 30 (65%) at 1 year. Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment), self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year. Highest expectations were career progression (39; 89%), increased confidence (38; 87%), development of networking skills (33; 75%), better time-management (29; 66%) and better work-life balance (28; 64%). For mentees, expectations at baseline were higher than perceived achievements at 6 months or 1 year follow-up. For mentors (N = 39), 36 (92%) completed the pre-mentoring survey, 32 (82%) at 6 months and 28 (72%) at 1 year. Mentors' highest expectations were of satisfaction in seeing people progress (26; 69%), seeing junior staff develop and grow (19; 53%), helping solve problems (18; 50%), helping women advance their careers (18; 50%) and helping remove career obstacles (13; 36%). Overall, gains at 6 months and 1 year exceeded pre-mentoring expectations.

Conclusions: This uncontrolled pilot study suggests that mentoring can improve aspects of job-related well-being, self-esteem and self-efficacy over 6 months, with further improvements seen after 1 year for female academics. Work-family conflict can also diminish. Despite these gains, mentees' prior expectations were shown to be unrealistically high, but mentors' expectations were exceeded.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus