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Osteopontin, asbestos exposure and pleural plaques: a cross-sectional study.

Mastrangelo G, Marangi G, Ballarin MN, Michilin S, Fabricio AS, Valentini F, Lange JH, Fedeli U, Cegolon L, Gion M - BMC Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: Osteopontin (OPN) is a plasma protein/cytokine produced in excess in several malignancies.Since asbestos in lung tissue tends to wane over time, OPN should decrease (rather than increase) with time since last exposure.Therefore, OPN cannot be a reliable biomarker of exposure nor effect (presence of pleural plaques).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Padua University, Padua, Italy. giuseppe.mastrangelo@unipd.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a plasma protein/cytokine produced in excess in several malignancies. In a recent study OPN was reported as being related to the duration of asbestos exposure and presence of benign asbestos-related diseases; however, it was unclear whether this protein was an indicator of exposure or effect.

Methods: In 193 workers, 50 with pleural plaques (PP), in whom different indicators of past asbestos exposure were estimated, OPN plasma levels were assessed using commercial quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassays according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Results: Osteopontin increased with increasing age and several aspects of asbestos exposure, without differences related to the presence of pleural plaques. At multivariable regression analysis, the explanatory variables with a significant independent influence on OPN were length of exposure (positive correlation) and time elapsed since last exposure (positive correlation).

Conclusions: Since asbestos in lung tissue tends to wane over time, OPN should decrease (rather than increase) with time since last exposure. Therefore, OPN cannot be a reliable biomarker of exposure nor effect (presence of pleural plaques).

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot of Osteopontin (OPN) versus age, time elapsed since first exposure (TSFE), time elapsed since last exposure (TSLE) and length of exposure, in workers with and without Pleural Plaques (PP), separately.
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Figure 1: Scatter plot of Osteopontin (OPN) versus age, time elapsed since first exposure (TSFE), time elapsed since last exposure (TSLE) and length of exposure, in workers with and without Pleural Plaques (PP), separately.

Mentions: Table 2 and figure 1 and 2 show that the trend of OPN over age or each aspect of exposure to asbestos fibres (TSLE, TSFE, length, cumulative and peak exposure) was not significantly different in relation to the presence of PP. Since smoking and peak exposure are not continuous variables, the regression coefficients could be interpreted as a linear trend across ordered categories.


Osteopontin, asbestos exposure and pleural plaques: a cross-sectional study.

Mastrangelo G, Marangi G, Ballarin MN, Michilin S, Fabricio AS, Valentini F, Lange JH, Fedeli U, Cegolon L, Gion M - BMC Public Health (2011)

Scatter plot of Osteopontin (OPN) versus age, time elapsed since first exposure (TSFE), time elapsed since last exposure (TSLE) and length of exposure, in workers with and without Pleural Plaques (PP), separately.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094241&req=5

Figure 1: Scatter plot of Osteopontin (OPN) versus age, time elapsed since first exposure (TSFE), time elapsed since last exposure (TSLE) and length of exposure, in workers with and without Pleural Plaques (PP), separately.
Mentions: Table 2 and figure 1 and 2 show that the trend of OPN over age or each aspect of exposure to asbestos fibres (TSLE, TSFE, length, cumulative and peak exposure) was not significantly different in relation to the presence of PP. Since smoking and peak exposure are not continuous variables, the regression coefficients could be interpreted as a linear trend across ordered categories.

Bottom Line: Osteopontin (OPN) is a plasma protein/cytokine produced in excess in several malignancies.Since asbestos in lung tissue tends to wane over time, OPN should decrease (rather than increase) with time since last exposure.Therefore, OPN cannot be a reliable biomarker of exposure nor effect (presence of pleural plaques).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Padua University, Padua, Italy. giuseppe.mastrangelo@unipd.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a plasma protein/cytokine produced in excess in several malignancies. In a recent study OPN was reported as being related to the duration of asbestos exposure and presence of benign asbestos-related diseases; however, it was unclear whether this protein was an indicator of exposure or effect.

Methods: In 193 workers, 50 with pleural plaques (PP), in whom different indicators of past asbestos exposure were estimated, OPN plasma levels were assessed using commercial quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassays according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Results: Osteopontin increased with increasing age and several aspects of asbestos exposure, without differences related to the presence of pleural plaques. At multivariable regression analysis, the explanatory variables with a significant independent influence on OPN were length of exposure (positive correlation) and time elapsed since last exposure (positive correlation).

Conclusions: Since asbestos in lung tissue tends to wane over time, OPN should decrease (rather than increase) with time since last exposure. Therefore, OPN cannot be a reliable biomarker of exposure nor effect (presence of pleural plaques).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus