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Acute osteomyelitis of the acetabulum induced by Staphylococcus capitis in a young athlete.

Fukuda S, Wada K, Yasuda K, Iwasa J, Yamaguchi S - Pediatr Rep (2010)

Bottom Line: We present an 11-year-old soccer athlete who suffered from acute osteomyelitis involving the acetabulum caused by S. capitis, a normal flora of the human skin but never reported in this condition.The disease was associated with repetitive skin injuries of the knee and potential osseous microtrauma of the hip joint by frequent rigorous exercise.This unusual case suggests that osseous microtrauma of the acetabulum, in addition to repetitive skin injuries, allowed normal skin flora to colonize to the ipsilateral acetabulum, which served as a favorable niche and subsequently led to AHOM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, and.

ABSTRACT
Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) of the acetabulum is a rare condition in children and usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We present an 11-year-old soccer athlete who suffered from acute osteomyelitis involving the acetabulum caused by S. capitis, a normal flora of the human skin but never reported in this condition. The disease was associated with repetitive skin injuries of the knee and potential osseous microtrauma of the hip joint by frequent rigorous exercise. This unusual case suggests that osseous microtrauma of the acetabulum, in addition to repetitive skin injuries, allowed normal skin flora to colonize to the ipsilateral acetabulum, which served as a favorable niche and subsequently led to AHOM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11. Increased isotope uptake by the left hip joint was observed. Arrows indicate the abnormal signal. R and L represent right and left, respectively.
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Figure 2: 67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11. Increased isotope uptake by the left hip joint was observed. Arrows indicate the abnormal signal. R and L represent right and left, respectively.

Mentions: 67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11 also showed increased isotope uptake by the same lesion (Figure 2). S. capitis was identified in the blood culture, but was sensitive to cephalosporin and penicillin. These findings led to the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis of the acetabulum, ilium, and ischium.


Acute osteomyelitis of the acetabulum induced by Staphylococcus capitis in a young athlete.

Fukuda S, Wada K, Yasuda K, Iwasa J, Yamaguchi S - Pediatr Rep (2010)

67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11. Increased isotope uptake by the left hip joint was observed. Arrows indicate the abnormal signal. R and L represent right and left, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094007&req=5

Figure 2: 67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11. Increased isotope uptake by the left hip joint was observed. Arrows indicate the abnormal signal. R and L represent right and left, respectively.
Mentions: 67Ga scintigraphy scanned on day 11 also showed increased isotope uptake by the same lesion (Figure 2). S. capitis was identified in the blood culture, but was sensitive to cephalosporin and penicillin. These findings led to the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis of the acetabulum, ilium, and ischium.

Bottom Line: We present an 11-year-old soccer athlete who suffered from acute osteomyelitis involving the acetabulum caused by S. capitis, a normal flora of the human skin but never reported in this condition.The disease was associated with repetitive skin injuries of the knee and potential osseous microtrauma of the hip joint by frequent rigorous exercise.This unusual case suggests that osseous microtrauma of the acetabulum, in addition to repetitive skin injuries, allowed normal skin flora to colonize to the ipsilateral acetabulum, which served as a favorable niche and subsequently led to AHOM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, and.

ABSTRACT
Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) of the acetabulum is a rare condition in children and usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We present an 11-year-old soccer athlete who suffered from acute osteomyelitis involving the acetabulum caused by S. capitis, a normal flora of the human skin but never reported in this condition. The disease was associated with repetitive skin injuries of the knee and potential osseous microtrauma of the hip joint by frequent rigorous exercise. This unusual case suggests that osseous microtrauma of the acetabulum, in addition to repetitive skin injuries, allowed normal skin flora to colonize to the ipsilateral acetabulum, which served as a favorable niche and subsequently led to AHOM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus