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Prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria.

Mokuolu OA, Suleiman B, Adesiyun O, Adeniyi A - Pediatr Rep (2010)

Bottom Line: Prematurity remains a significant cause of these early neonatal deaths.Out of the 2,489 deliveries that took place over a 9-month period, there were 293 pre-terms, giving a pre-term delivery rate of 120 per 1,000 deliveries.The prevalence of pre-term delivery was 120 per 1,000 live births.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Paediatrics, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria;

ABSTRACT
In Nigeria, over 900,000 children under the age of five years die every year. Early neonatal death is responsible for a little over 20% of these deaths. Prematurity remains a significant cause of these early neonatal deaths. In some series, it is reported to be responsible for 60-70% of these deaths. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. This was a prospective cohort study conducted over a 9-month period at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Records of deliveries and data on maternal socio-biological and antenatal variables were collected during this period in order to determine the prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries. Out of the 2,489 deliveries that took place over a 9-month period, there were 293 pre-terms, giving a pre-term delivery rate of 120 per 1,000 deliveries. Of the total deliveries, 1,522 singleton deliveries that satisfied inclusion criteria were recruited; 185 of them were pre-term deliveries giving a case:control ratio of 1:7. Significant determinants of pre-term delivery identified were previous pre-term delivery (P=0.001; OR=3.55; 95% CI=1.71-7.30), antepartum hemorrhage (P=0.000; OR=8.95; 95%CI=4.06-19.78), premature rupture of the membranes (P=0.000; OR=6.48; 95%CI=4.33-9.67), maternal urinary tract infection (P=0.006; OR=5.89; 95%CI=1.16-27.57), pregnancy induced hypertension (P=0.007; OR=3.23; 95%CI=2.09-4.99), type of labor (P=0.000; OR=6.44; 95%CI=4.42-9.38) and booking status (P=0.000; OR=4.67; 95%CI=3.33-6.56). The prevalence of pre-term delivery was 120 per 1,000 live births. Factors significantly associated with pre-term delivery were low socio-economic class, previous pre-term delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of fetal membranes, urinary tract infection, pregnancy induced hypertension, induced labor, and booking elsewhere outside the teaching hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of all deliveries by estimated gestational age.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Distribution of all deliveries by estimated gestational age.

Mentions: The pre-term delivery rate (<37 wks) was 120 per 1,000 deliveries. Early pre-term delivery rate (<34 wks) was 40 per 1,000 deliveries as shown in Figure 1.


Prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria.

Mokuolu OA, Suleiman B, Adesiyun O, Adeniyi A - Pediatr Rep (2010)

Distribution of all deliveries by estimated gestational age.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3094003&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of all deliveries by estimated gestational age.
Mentions: The pre-term delivery rate (<37 wks) was 120 per 1,000 deliveries. Early pre-term delivery rate (<34 wks) was 40 per 1,000 deliveries as shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Prematurity remains a significant cause of these early neonatal deaths.Out of the 2,489 deliveries that took place over a 9-month period, there were 293 pre-terms, giving a pre-term delivery rate of 120 per 1,000 deliveries.The prevalence of pre-term delivery was 120 per 1,000 live births.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Paediatrics, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria;

ABSTRACT
In Nigeria, over 900,000 children under the age of five years die every year. Early neonatal death is responsible for a little over 20% of these deaths. Prematurity remains a significant cause of these early neonatal deaths. In some series, it is reported to be responsible for 60-70% of these deaths. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. This was a prospective cohort study conducted over a 9-month period at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Records of deliveries and data on maternal socio-biological and antenatal variables were collected during this period in order to determine the prevalence and determinants of pre-term deliveries. Out of the 2,489 deliveries that took place over a 9-month period, there were 293 pre-terms, giving a pre-term delivery rate of 120 per 1,000 deliveries. Of the total deliveries, 1,522 singleton deliveries that satisfied inclusion criteria were recruited; 185 of them were pre-term deliveries giving a case:control ratio of 1:7. Significant determinants of pre-term delivery identified were previous pre-term delivery (P=0.001; OR=3.55; 95% CI=1.71-7.30), antepartum hemorrhage (P=0.000; OR=8.95; 95%CI=4.06-19.78), premature rupture of the membranes (P=0.000; OR=6.48; 95%CI=4.33-9.67), maternal urinary tract infection (P=0.006; OR=5.89; 95%CI=1.16-27.57), pregnancy induced hypertension (P=0.007; OR=3.23; 95%CI=2.09-4.99), type of labor (P=0.000; OR=6.44; 95%CI=4.42-9.38) and booking status (P=0.000; OR=4.67; 95%CI=3.33-6.56). The prevalence of pre-term delivery was 120 per 1,000 live births. Factors significantly associated with pre-term delivery were low socio-economic class, previous pre-term delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of fetal membranes, urinary tract infection, pregnancy induced hypertension, induced labor, and booking elsewhere outside the teaching hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus