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SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

Lewis SL, Feighner BH, Loschen WA, Wojcik RA, Skora JF, Coberly JS, Blazes DL - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability.This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system.The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Security Technology Department, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, United States of America. Sheri.Lewis@jhuapl.edu

ABSTRACT
Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

Show MeSH
Role-based Information Sharing.InfoShare allows each user to determine role-based access to public health information. The data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.
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pone-0019750-g005: Role-based Information Sharing.InfoShare allows each user to determine role-based access to public health information. The data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.

Mentions: SAGES tools can facilitate compliance with 2005 IHR reporting requirements and allow the sharing of actionable information across jurisdictional boundaries. Sharing of patient-level data across regional boundaries is generally not realistic and often not helpful, as local public health entities are usually best suited to interpret local events. However, once these data have been transformed into meaningful information, it may be immensely valuable to share that information with other countries in the region. Dissemination of this type of information may aid in the interpretation of regional events and helps foster better, lasting public health collaborations. SAGES includes tools for two-way communication between public health officials and graphics that are exportable into common image formats. Each SAGES user controls the type and level of detail of all information shared with each recipient (‘role-based access’) and also whether the information sharing is manual or automated. [14] (Figure 5) More importantly, the data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.


SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

Lewis SL, Feighner BH, Loschen WA, Wojcik RA, Skora JF, Coberly JS, Blazes DL - PLoS ONE (2011)

Role-based Information Sharing.InfoShare allows each user to determine role-based access to public health information. The data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3091876&req=5

pone-0019750-g005: Role-based Information Sharing.InfoShare allows each user to determine role-based access to public health information. The data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.
Mentions: SAGES tools can facilitate compliance with 2005 IHR reporting requirements and allow the sharing of actionable information across jurisdictional boundaries. Sharing of patient-level data across regional boundaries is generally not realistic and often not helpful, as local public health entities are usually best suited to interpret local events. However, once these data have been transformed into meaningful information, it may be immensely valuable to share that information with other countries in the region. Dissemination of this type of information may aid in the interpretation of regional events and helps foster better, lasting public health collaborations. SAGES includes tools for two-way communication between public health officials and graphics that are exportable into common image formats. Each SAGES user controls the type and level of detail of all information shared with each recipient (‘role-based access’) and also whether the information sharing is manual or automated. [14] (Figure 5) More importantly, the data are collected and stored only by the user, and remain under the sole control of the user at all times.

Bottom Line: One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability.This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system.The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Security Technology Department, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, United States of America. Sheri.Lewis@jhuapl.edu

ABSTRACT
Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

Show MeSH