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SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

Lewis SL, Feighner BH, Loschen WA, Wojcik RA, Skora JF, Coberly JS, Blazes DL - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability.This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system.The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Security Technology Department, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, United States of America. Sheri.Lewis@jhuapl.edu

ABSTRACT
Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

Show MeSH
Mapping Utilities.OpenESSENCE and EDE users can map spatial data, cases, and alert levels in geographic areas defined in the data. OpenESSENCE embeds maps in the application using a GeoServer interface. EDE embeds maps through a uDig interface or optionally launches CDC's EpiMap application with Environmental Systems Research Institute shape files.
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pone-0019750-g003: Mapping Utilities.OpenESSENCE and EDE users can map spatial data, cases, and alert levels in geographic areas defined in the data. OpenESSENCE embeds maps in the application using a GeoServer interface. EDE embeds maps through a uDig interface or optionally launches CDC's EpiMap application with Environmental Systems Research Institute shape files.

Mentions: The desktop tool, known as ESSENCE Desktop Edition (EDE), is a single-user stand-alone analysis and visualization tool that can be installed on most computers. EDE does not need access to the internet as it ingests data files stored on the same computer. The web-based tool, known as OpenESSENCE, is a multi-user network accessible data entry, analysis, and visualization tool that enables an epidemiologist to monitor the population's health from any computer connected to that network. Available analyses for both tools depend on the nature of the data ingestion, but may include demographic characterizations, temporal and spatial analyses, display of patient level information, geographic information system mapping, anomalous event detection, and dynamic query capability. (Figures 2, 3, 4)


SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

Lewis SL, Feighner BH, Loschen WA, Wojcik RA, Skora JF, Coberly JS, Blazes DL - PLoS ONE (2011)

Mapping Utilities.OpenESSENCE and EDE users can map spatial data, cases, and alert levels in geographic areas defined in the data. OpenESSENCE embeds maps in the application using a GeoServer interface. EDE embeds maps through a uDig interface or optionally launches CDC's EpiMap application with Environmental Systems Research Institute shape files.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3091876&req=5

pone-0019750-g003: Mapping Utilities.OpenESSENCE and EDE users can map spatial data, cases, and alert levels in geographic areas defined in the data. OpenESSENCE embeds maps in the application using a GeoServer interface. EDE embeds maps through a uDig interface or optionally launches CDC's EpiMap application with Environmental Systems Research Institute shape files.
Mentions: The desktop tool, known as ESSENCE Desktop Edition (EDE), is a single-user stand-alone analysis and visualization tool that can be installed on most computers. EDE does not need access to the internet as it ingests data files stored on the same computer. The web-based tool, known as OpenESSENCE, is a multi-user network accessible data entry, analysis, and visualization tool that enables an epidemiologist to monitor the population's health from any computer connected to that network. Available analyses for both tools depend on the nature of the data ingestion, but may include demographic characterizations, temporal and spatial analyses, display of patient level information, geographic information system mapping, anomalous event detection, and dynamic query capability. (Figures 2, 3, 4)

Bottom Line: One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability.This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system.The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Security Technology Department, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, United States of America. Sheri.Lewis@jhuapl.edu

ABSTRACT
Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

Show MeSH