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The influence of practice standards on massage therapists' work experience: a phenomenological pilot study.

Fortune LD, Gillespie E - Int J Ther Massage Bodywork (2010)

Bottom Line: This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods.Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns.The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a "one size fits all" categorization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Human Organization and Development, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a "one size fits all" categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant (Pt) selection flowchart. M = male; y.o. = years old; F = female.
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f1-73-752-1-le: Participant (Pt) selection flowchart. M = male; y.o. = years old; F = female.

Mentions: Practitioners were excluded if they had not been actively practicing during the preceding 6 months, did not meet the study criteria (Figure 1), or could not commit time within the necessary schedule. Each participant in the study is identified by an alias of their choosing. The Institutional Review Board at Fielding Graduate University approved this research project, and all participants gave written informed consent for the study. Participants received no monetary compensation for their participation in the study.


The influence of practice standards on massage therapists' work experience: a phenomenological pilot study.

Fortune LD, Gillespie E - Int J Ther Massage Bodywork (2010)

Participant (Pt) selection flowchart. M = male; y.o. = years old; F = female.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3091437&req=5

f1-73-752-1-le: Participant (Pt) selection flowchart. M = male; y.o. = years old; F = female.
Mentions: Practitioners were excluded if they had not been actively practicing during the preceding 6 months, did not meet the study criteria (Figure 1), or could not commit time within the necessary schedule. Each participant in the study is identified by an alias of their choosing. The Institutional Review Board at Fielding Graduate University approved this research project, and all participants gave written informed consent for the study. Participants received no monetary compensation for their participation in the study.

Bottom Line: This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods.Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns.The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a "one size fits all" categorization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Human Organization and Development, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a "one size fits all" categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus