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Laboratory and field testing of an automated atmospheric particle-bound reactive oxygen species sampling-analysis system.

Wang Y, Hopke PK, Sun L, Chalupa DC, Utell MJ - J Toxicol (2011)

Bottom Line: In this study, various laboratory and field tests were performed to develop an effective automated particle-bound ROS sampling-analysis system.The laboratory results show that the DCFH and H(2)O(2) standard solutions could be kept at room temperature for at least three and eight days, respectively.The ROS concentrations were observed to be greater after foggy conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Air Resource Engineering and Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5708, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study, various laboratory and field tests were performed to develop an effective automated particle-bound ROS sampling-analysis system. The system uses 2' 7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) fluorescence method as a nonspecific, general indicator of the particle-bound ROS. A sharp-cut cyclone and a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) were used to collect PM(2.5) atmospheric particles into slurry produced by a DCFH-HRP solution. The laboratory results show that the DCFH and H(2)O(2) standard solutions could be kept at room temperature for at least three and eight days, respectively. The field test in Rochester, NY, shows that the average ROS concentration was 8.3 ± 2.2 nmol of equivalent H(2)O(2) m(-3) of air. The ROS concentrations were observed to be greater after foggy conditions. This study demonstrates the first practical automated sampling-analysis system to measure this ambient particle component.

No MeSH data available.


Calibration plot of the system with standard H2O2 solutions in the field.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Calibration plot of the system with standard H2O2 solutions in the field.

Mentions: The standard operation procedure for running the automated ROS system is given in Appendix B. Calibration of the system was performed with standard H2O2 solutions of concentrations ranging from 100 to 400 nM, prepared by serial dilutions of a 30% stock solution of H2O2, with MilliQ water serving as a blank. A HEPA filter was placed in front of the system during calibration running. Figure 3 shows the blank-subtracted linear calibration curve obtained in the field. The system was linear (R2 = 0.995) over the range of H2O2 concentrations by least-squares analysis. The relationship between H2O2 concentration and FI is expressed as the equation in the figure.


Laboratory and field testing of an automated atmospheric particle-bound reactive oxygen species sampling-analysis system.

Wang Y, Hopke PK, Sun L, Chalupa DC, Utell MJ - J Toxicol (2011)

Calibration plot of the system with standard H2O2 solutions in the field.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3090747&req=5

fig3: Calibration plot of the system with standard H2O2 solutions in the field.
Mentions: The standard operation procedure for running the automated ROS system is given in Appendix B. Calibration of the system was performed with standard H2O2 solutions of concentrations ranging from 100 to 400 nM, prepared by serial dilutions of a 30% stock solution of H2O2, with MilliQ water serving as a blank. A HEPA filter was placed in front of the system during calibration running. Figure 3 shows the blank-subtracted linear calibration curve obtained in the field. The system was linear (R2 = 0.995) over the range of H2O2 concentrations by least-squares analysis. The relationship between H2O2 concentration and FI is expressed as the equation in the figure.

Bottom Line: In this study, various laboratory and field tests were performed to develop an effective automated particle-bound ROS sampling-analysis system.The laboratory results show that the DCFH and H(2)O(2) standard solutions could be kept at room temperature for at least three and eight days, respectively.The ROS concentrations were observed to be greater after foggy conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Air Resource Engineering and Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5708, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study, various laboratory and field tests were performed to develop an effective automated particle-bound ROS sampling-analysis system. The system uses 2' 7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) fluorescence method as a nonspecific, general indicator of the particle-bound ROS. A sharp-cut cyclone and a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) were used to collect PM(2.5) atmospheric particles into slurry produced by a DCFH-HRP solution. The laboratory results show that the DCFH and H(2)O(2) standard solutions could be kept at room temperature for at least three and eight days, respectively. The field test in Rochester, NY, shows that the average ROS concentration was 8.3 ± 2.2 nmol of equivalent H(2)O(2) m(-3) of air. The ROS concentrations were observed to be greater after foggy conditions. This study demonstrates the first practical automated sampling-analysis system to measure this ambient particle component.

No MeSH data available.