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Amelioration of lead-induced hepatotoxicity by Allium sativum extracts in Swiss albino mice.

Sharma A, Sharma V, Kansal L - Libyan J Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Lead nitrate exposure also produced detrimental effects on the redox status of the liver indicated by a significant decline in the levels of liver antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione.Histological examination of the liver also revealed pathophysiological changes in lead nitrate-exposed group and treatment with garlic improved liver histology.Our data suggest that garlic is a phytoantioxidant that can counteract the deleterious effects of lead nitrate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Banasthali University, Banasthali, Rajasthan, India.

ABSTRACT
Lead is a blue-gray and highly toxic divalent metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust and is spread throughout the environment by various human activities. The efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) to reduce hepatotoxicity induced by lead nitrate was evaluated experimentally in male mice. Oral treatment with lead nitrate at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 40 days (1/45 of LD(50)) induced a significant increase in the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, and lead nitrate. In parallel, hepatic protein levels in lead-exposed mice were significantly depleted. Lead nitrate exposure also produced detrimental effects on the redox status of the liver indicated by a significant decline in the levels of liver antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione. After exposure to lead nitrate (50 mg/kg body weight for 10 days), the animals received aqueous garlic extract (250 mg/kg body weight and 500 mg/kg body weight) and ethanolic garlic extract (100 mg/kg body weight and 250 mg/kg body weight), and partially restored the deranged parameters significantly. Histological examination of the liver also revealed pathophysiological changes in lead nitrate-exposed group and treatment with garlic improved liver histology. Our data suggest that garlic is a phytoantioxidant that can counteract the deleterious effects of lead nitrate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transverse section of the liver of a mouse treated with lead nitrate showing congestion of central vein, vacuolization, leucocytic infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, and loss of radial arrangement of hepatocytes.
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Figure 0002: Transverse section of the liver of a mouse treated with lead nitrate showing congestion of central vein, vacuolization, leucocytic infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, and loss of radial arrangement of hepatocytes.

Mentions: The livers of mice exposed to lead nitrate for 40 days revealed disruption of the normal structural organization of the hepatic lobules and loss of the characteristic cord-like arrangement of the normal liver cells. The central and portal veins were congested. Many hepatic cells were damaged and lost their characteristic appearance while others showed marked cytoplasmic vacuolization. The nuclei of these cells were pyknotic. The central vein and sinusoids between hepatocytes were dilated. Some leukocyte infiltration and fatty deposition were also evident (Fig. 2).


Amelioration of lead-induced hepatotoxicity by Allium sativum extracts in Swiss albino mice.

Sharma A, Sharma V, Kansal L - Libyan J Med (2010)

Transverse section of the liver of a mouse treated with lead nitrate showing congestion of central vein, vacuolization, leucocytic infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, and loss of radial arrangement of hepatocytes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066784&req=5

Figure 0002: Transverse section of the liver of a mouse treated with lead nitrate showing congestion of central vein, vacuolization, leucocytic infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, and loss of radial arrangement of hepatocytes.
Mentions: The livers of mice exposed to lead nitrate for 40 days revealed disruption of the normal structural organization of the hepatic lobules and loss of the characteristic cord-like arrangement of the normal liver cells. The central and portal veins were congested. Many hepatic cells were damaged and lost their characteristic appearance while others showed marked cytoplasmic vacuolization. The nuclei of these cells were pyknotic. The central vein and sinusoids between hepatocytes were dilated. Some leukocyte infiltration and fatty deposition were also evident (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Lead nitrate exposure also produced detrimental effects on the redox status of the liver indicated by a significant decline in the levels of liver antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione.Histological examination of the liver also revealed pathophysiological changes in lead nitrate-exposed group and treatment with garlic improved liver histology.Our data suggest that garlic is a phytoantioxidant that can counteract the deleterious effects of lead nitrate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Banasthali University, Banasthali, Rajasthan, India.

ABSTRACT
Lead is a blue-gray and highly toxic divalent metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust and is spread throughout the environment by various human activities. The efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) to reduce hepatotoxicity induced by lead nitrate was evaluated experimentally in male mice. Oral treatment with lead nitrate at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 40 days (1/45 of LD(50)) induced a significant increase in the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, and lead nitrate. In parallel, hepatic protein levels in lead-exposed mice were significantly depleted. Lead nitrate exposure also produced detrimental effects on the redox status of the liver indicated by a significant decline in the levels of liver antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione. After exposure to lead nitrate (50 mg/kg body weight for 10 days), the animals received aqueous garlic extract (250 mg/kg body weight and 500 mg/kg body weight) and ethanolic garlic extract (100 mg/kg body weight and 250 mg/kg body weight), and partially restored the deranged parameters significantly. Histological examination of the liver also revealed pathophysiological changes in lead nitrate-exposed group and treatment with garlic improved liver histology. Our data suggest that garlic is a phytoantioxidant that can counteract the deleterious effects of lead nitrate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus