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Gall bladder and colonic opacification following parenteral iohexol.

Mishra A, Ehtuish EF, Abukhair D - Libyan J Med (2010)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, National Organ Transplant Program, Tripoli Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya.

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Abdominal CT scan was arranged and 40cc of 350mg I/mL of injection iohexol was injected intravenously prior to the scan (Fig. 1)... A 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 4cc/sec and the patient was scanned in arterial phase from the level of diaphragm to the iliac crest (Fig. 2)... In our center, we use injection iohexol in strength of 300 and 350mg I/mL as CT scan contrast... The dose of contrast ranges from 50 to 150cc depending on the type of examination, age, weight, and general condition of the patient... Yamazaki et al. found no significant correlation between delayed gall bladder opacification and contrast associated nephropathy as in our case... Kaizu et al. and Tajima et al. attributed gall bladder opacification to the important role of hepatobiliary tract in the excretion of ioxaglate... However, iohexol is excreted completely almost unchanged through the kidneys within 24 hours in patients with normal renal function with half life of 2 hours with no detectable metabolites... The protein binding of iohexol is so low (<2%) that it has no clinical relevance, and can therefore be neglected (information from product leaflet published by Amersham Health, Norway, December 2003)... We conclude that gall bladder and colonic opacification may not be as uncommon as is generally thought, but their timing and location in most of the cases does not allow making this observation.

No MeSH data available.


First scan: axial CT scan with 40cc intravenous contrast.
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Figure 0001: First scan: axial CT scan with 40cc intravenous contrast.

Mentions: Abdominal CT scan was arranged and 40cc of 350mg I/mL of injection iohexol was injected intravenously prior to the scan (Fig. 1). In view of severe hydronephrosis, no contrast excretion was seen on the scanogram until after 4 hours and hence the patient was recalled after 24 hours for the scan. A 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 4cc/sec and the patient was scanned in arterial phase from the level of diaphragm to the iliac crest (Fig. 2). In the middle of the scan, however, the patient moved on the table. Hence, a repeat scan was performed with additional 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) in arterial and venous phases for the renal vessels (Fig. 3). As there was no contrast excretion in the hydronephrotic kidney, the patient was recalled after another 24 hours for an urographic scan (Fig. 4). At this time, a thin section plain scan was performed from the level of dome of diaphragm to the symphysis pubis and it was observed that there was gall bladder and colonic opacification with contrast, with similar Hounsfield values to excreted contrast in hydronephrotic left kidney (Fig. 5). There was no evidence of contrast-induced nephropathy.


Gall bladder and colonic opacification following parenteral iohexol.

Mishra A, Ehtuish EF, Abukhair D - Libyan J Med (2010)

First scan: axial CT scan with 40cc intravenous contrast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066773&req=5

Figure 0001: First scan: axial CT scan with 40cc intravenous contrast.
Mentions: Abdominal CT scan was arranged and 40cc of 350mg I/mL of injection iohexol was injected intravenously prior to the scan (Fig. 1). In view of severe hydronephrosis, no contrast excretion was seen on the scanogram until after 4 hours and hence the patient was recalled after 24 hours for the scan. A 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 4cc/sec and the patient was scanned in arterial phase from the level of diaphragm to the iliac crest (Fig. 2). In the middle of the scan, however, the patient moved on the table. Hence, a repeat scan was performed with additional 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) in arterial and venous phases for the renal vessels (Fig. 3). As there was no contrast excretion in the hydronephrotic kidney, the patient was recalled after another 24 hours for an urographic scan (Fig. 4). At this time, a thin section plain scan was performed from the level of dome of diaphragm to the symphysis pubis and it was observed that there was gall bladder and colonic opacification with contrast, with similar Hounsfield values to excreted contrast in hydronephrotic left kidney (Fig. 5). There was no evidence of contrast-induced nephropathy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, National Organ Transplant Program, Tripoli Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Abdominal CT scan was arranged and 40cc of 350mg I/mL of injection iohexol was injected intravenously prior to the scan (Fig. 1)... A 100cc of injection iohexol (350mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 4cc/sec and the patient was scanned in arterial phase from the level of diaphragm to the iliac crest (Fig. 2)... In our center, we use injection iohexol in strength of 300 and 350mg I/mL as CT scan contrast... The dose of contrast ranges from 50 to 150cc depending on the type of examination, age, weight, and general condition of the patient... Yamazaki et al. found no significant correlation between delayed gall bladder opacification and contrast associated nephropathy as in our case... Kaizu et al. and Tajima et al. attributed gall bladder opacification to the important role of hepatobiliary tract in the excretion of ioxaglate... However, iohexol is excreted completely almost unchanged through the kidneys within 24 hours in patients with normal renal function with half life of 2 hours with no detectable metabolites... The protein binding of iohexol is so low (<2%) that it has no clinical relevance, and can therefore be neglected (information from product leaflet published by Amersham Health, Norway, December 2003)... We conclude that gall bladder and colonic opacification may not be as uncommon as is generally thought, but their timing and location in most of the cases does not allow making this observation.

No MeSH data available.