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Skin and systemic manifestations of jellyfish stings in iraqi fishermen.

Al-Rubiay K, Al-Musaoi H, Alrubaiy L, Al-Freje M - Libyan J Med (2009)

Bottom Line: The common sites of sings were the hands and arms followed by the legs.The local remedies commonly used by the fishermen were seawater, tap water and ice.Self-treatment by topical remedies is common.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Basra University and Department of Dermatology, Basra General Hospital.

ABSTRACT

Background: Jellyfish stings are common worldwide with an estimated 150 million cases annually, and their stings cause a wide range of clinical manifestations from skin inflammation to cardiovascular and respiratory collapse. No studies on jellyfish stings have been carried out in Basra, Iraq.

Objectives: To describe the immediate and delayed skin reactions to White Jellyfish (Rhizostoma sp.) stings and the types of local treatment used by fishermen.

Methods and materials: 150 fishermen were enrolled at three Marine stations in Basra, Iraq. Demographic data, types of skin reactions, systemic manifestations and kinds of treatments were collected.

Results: Overall, 79% of fishermen in all three Marine stations gave a history of having been stung. The common sites of sings were the hands and arms followed by the legs. Most fishermen claimed that stings led to skin reactions within 5 minutes. The presenting complaints were itching, burning sensation, and erythematic wheals. A few days after the sting, new groups of painless and itchy erythematous monomorphic papular rashes developed at the site of the sting in 62% of cases as a delayed type of skin reaction that resolved spontaneously. The local remedies commonly used by the fishermen were seawater, tap water and ice. A few fishermen considered stings as insignificant and did not think there was a need to seek medical help.

Conclusions: We conclude that jellyfish causes many stings among fishermen in the Basra region. Their stings lead to immediate and delayed skin reactions. Self-treatment by topical remedies is common.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

12 hours after the exposure to jelly
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Figure 0002: 12 hours after the exposure to jelly

Mentions: Overall, 78.7% of the fishermen gave a history of jellyfish stings during the three months preceding the interview. There was no significant difference between the three stations (Table 1). The common sites of stings were the hands and arms (65.4%) followed by the legs (29.9%). Other parts of the body were also attacked, such as the abdomen, eyes and back (Table 2). Most fishermen (95.2%) claimed that stinging led to skin reactions within 5 minutes. The presenting complaints were pain (89%), itching (68%), burning sensation (45%), and erythematic wheals (90.5%) (Figure 2). Fainting was reported by 3% of the fishermen. About three days after the sting, painless but itchy erythematous monomorphic papular rashes (Figures 3 and 4) developed at the sites of the stings in 62% of the fishermen as a delayed type of skin reaction that resolved spontaneously in most cases (Table 3).


Skin and systemic manifestations of jellyfish stings in iraqi fishermen.

Al-Rubiay K, Al-Musaoi H, Alrubaiy L, Al-Freje M - Libyan J Med (2009)

12 hours after the exposure to jelly
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066723&req=5

Figure 0002: 12 hours after the exposure to jelly
Mentions: Overall, 78.7% of the fishermen gave a history of jellyfish stings during the three months preceding the interview. There was no significant difference between the three stations (Table 1). The common sites of stings were the hands and arms (65.4%) followed by the legs (29.9%). Other parts of the body were also attacked, such as the abdomen, eyes and back (Table 2). Most fishermen (95.2%) claimed that stinging led to skin reactions within 5 minutes. The presenting complaints were pain (89%), itching (68%), burning sensation (45%), and erythematic wheals (90.5%) (Figure 2). Fainting was reported by 3% of the fishermen. About three days after the sting, painless but itchy erythematous monomorphic papular rashes (Figures 3 and 4) developed at the sites of the stings in 62% of the fishermen as a delayed type of skin reaction that resolved spontaneously in most cases (Table 3).

Bottom Line: The common sites of sings were the hands and arms followed by the legs.The local remedies commonly used by the fishermen were seawater, tap water and ice.Self-treatment by topical remedies is common.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Basra University and Department of Dermatology, Basra General Hospital.

ABSTRACT

Background: Jellyfish stings are common worldwide with an estimated 150 million cases annually, and their stings cause a wide range of clinical manifestations from skin inflammation to cardiovascular and respiratory collapse. No studies on jellyfish stings have been carried out in Basra, Iraq.

Objectives: To describe the immediate and delayed skin reactions to White Jellyfish (Rhizostoma sp.) stings and the types of local treatment used by fishermen.

Methods and materials: 150 fishermen were enrolled at three Marine stations in Basra, Iraq. Demographic data, types of skin reactions, systemic manifestations and kinds of treatments were collected.

Results: Overall, 79% of fishermen in all three Marine stations gave a history of having been stung. The common sites of sings were the hands and arms followed by the legs. Most fishermen claimed that stings led to skin reactions within 5 minutes. The presenting complaints were itching, burning sensation, and erythematic wheals. A few days after the sting, new groups of painless and itchy erythematous monomorphic papular rashes developed at the site of the sting in 62% of cases as a delayed type of skin reaction that resolved spontaneously. The local remedies commonly used by the fishermen were seawater, tap water and ice. A few fishermen considered stings as insignificant and did not think there was a need to seek medical help.

Conclusions: We conclude that jellyfish causes many stings among fishermen in the Basra region. Their stings lead to immediate and delayed skin reactions. Self-treatment by topical remedies is common.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus