Limits...
Recurrence of uterine rupture in a pseudo-unicornuate uterus at 17 weeks of amenorrhea: case report and literature review.

Errarhay S, Mahmoud S, Bouchikhi C, Châara H, Bouguern H, Melhouf M, Banani A - Libyan J Med (2009)

Bottom Line: Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is a very rare condition.It is responsible for several complications.Classically, the treatment after foetal extraction consists of ablation of the rudimentary horn and associated fallopian tube.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Hospital of Fez, Morocco.

ABSTRACT
Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is a very rare condition. It is responsible for several complications. Prognosis is reserved because the natural evolution generally leads to a cataclysmic uterine rupture at the beginning of the second trimester. Classically, the treatment after foetal extraction consists of ablation of the rudimentary horn and associated fallopian tube. We report the obstetric outcome of a patient with history of rudimentary uterine horn rupture, the treatment of which was ablation of the rudimentary horn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasound scan showing a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, a placenta, and a non-viable foetus of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrial structure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066713&req=5

Figure 0001: Ultrasound scan showing a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, a placenta, and a non-viable foetus of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrial structure.

Mentions: During laparotomy, the amniotic membranes were discovered bulging into the abdominal cavity from a breach in the ruptured left rudimentary uterine horn in what was discovered to be a pseudo-unicornuate uterus. Treatment consisted of ablation of the left rudimentary horn, with excision extending to its junction with the right hemi-uterus. The current pregnancy was unbooked at presentation. Its evolution was marked by the appearance of pelvic pain at 17 weeks gestation. There was no bleeding but the patient was noted to have malaise and fatigue. On clinical examination, the blood pressure was 90/50 mm/Hg, pulse was 100 bpm, and there was mucocutaneous pallor. The abdominal examination showed pelvic guarding, and both flanks were dull to percussion. The gynaecological exam found a bulky uterus with cervical excitation and pelvic peritonism. Physical assessment revealed a hemoglobin of 6 g/dl. Ultrasound scan showed a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, placenta, and a non-viable pregnancy of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrium. They also noted a large intra-peritoneal effusion, suggesting an abdominal pregnancy (figure 1).


Recurrence of uterine rupture in a pseudo-unicornuate uterus at 17 weeks of amenorrhea: case report and literature review.

Errarhay S, Mahmoud S, Bouchikhi C, Châara H, Bouguern H, Melhouf M, Banani A - Libyan J Med (2009)

Ultrasound scan showing a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, a placenta, and a non-viable foetus of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrial structure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066713&req=5

Figure 0001: Ultrasound scan showing a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, a placenta, and a non-viable foetus of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrial structure.
Mentions: During laparotomy, the amniotic membranes were discovered bulging into the abdominal cavity from a breach in the ruptured left rudimentary uterine horn in what was discovered to be a pseudo-unicornuate uterus. Treatment consisted of ablation of the left rudimentary horn, with excision extending to its junction with the right hemi-uterus. The current pregnancy was unbooked at presentation. Its evolution was marked by the appearance of pelvic pain at 17 weeks gestation. There was no bleeding but the patient was noted to have malaise and fatigue. On clinical examination, the blood pressure was 90/50 mm/Hg, pulse was 100 bpm, and there was mucocutaneous pallor. The abdominal examination showed pelvic guarding, and both flanks were dull to percussion. The gynaecological exam found a bulky uterus with cervical excitation and pelvic peritonism. Physical assessment revealed a hemoglobin of 6 g/dl. Ultrasound scan showed a uterus of normal structure with an empty cavity, placenta, and a non-viable pregnancy of 17 week's gestation outside the myometrium. They also noted a large intra-peritoneal effusion, suggesting an abdominal pregnancy (figure 1).

Bottom Line: Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is a very rare condition.It is responsible for several complications.Classically, the treatment after foetal extraction consists of ablation of the rudimentary horn and associated fallopian tube.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Hospital of Fez, Morocco.

ABSTRACT
Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is a very rare condition. It is responsible for several complications. Prognosis is reserved because the natural evolution generally leads to a cataclysmic uterine rupture at the beginning of the second trimester. Classically, the treatment after foetal extraction consists of ablation of the rudimentary horn and associated fallopian tube. We report the obstetric outcome of a patient with history of rudimentary uterine horn rupture, the treatment of which was ablation of the rudimentary horn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus