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Can evidence-based medicine and clinical quality improvement learn from each other?

Glasziou P, Ogrinc G, Goodman S - BMJ Qual Saf (2011)

Bottom Line: EBM has focused more on 'doing the right things'--based on external research evidence--whereas Quality Improvement (QI) has focused more on 'doing things right'--based on local processes.However, these are complementary and in combination direct us how to 'do the right things right'.This article examines the differences and similarities in the two approaches and proposes that by integrating the bedside application, the methodological development and the training of these complementary disciplines both would gain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Centre for Research into Evidence-Based Practice, Gold Coast, Queensland 4229, Australia. pglaszio@bond.edu.au

ABSTRACT
The considerable gap between what we know from research and what is done in clinical practice is well known. Proposed responses include the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) and Clinical Quality Improvement. EBM has focused more on 'doing the right things'--based on external research evidence--whereas Quality Improvement (QI) has focused more on 'doing things right'--based on local processes. However, these are complementary and in combination direct us how to 'do the right things right'. This article examines the differences and similarities in the two approaches and proposes that by integrating the bedside application, the methodological development and the training of these complementary disciplines both would gain.

Show MeSH
Proposed linkage between EBM and one model for QI.
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fig2: Proposed linkage between EBM and one model for QI.

Mentions: As illustrated by the above examples, EBM is involved in the early stages of checking the validity and applicability of the available evidence to the clinical problem. This involves the traditional ‘four steps’ of EBM illustrated in figure 2. QI processes15 may be triggered at the fourth step if it seems likely that the clinical problem is a common one for which the current system of practice is not optimal.16 Similarly, in the planning stage of a QI project there may be several questions that trigger an EBM cycle to check for evidence.


Can evidence-based medicine and clinical quality improvement learn from each other?

Glasziou P, Ogrinc G, Goodman S - BMJ Qual Saf (2011)

Proposed linkage between EBM and one model for QI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066698&req=5

fig2: Proposed linkage between EBM and one model for QI.
Mentions: As illustrated by the above examples, EBM is involved in the early stages of checking the validity and applicability of the available evidence to the clinical problem. This involves the traditional ‘four steps’ of EBM illustrated in figure 2. QI processes15 may be triggered at the fourth step if it seems likely that the clinical problem is a common one for which the current system of practice is not optimal.16 Similarly, in the planning stage of a QI project there may be several questions that trigger an EBM cycle to check for evidence.

Bottom Line: EBM has focused more on 'doing the right things'--based on external research evidence--whereas Quality Improvement (QI) has focused more on 'doing things right'--based on local processes.However, these are complementary and in combination direct us how to 'do the right things right'.This article examines the differences and similarities in the two approaches and proposes that by integrating the bedside application, the methodological development and the training of these complementary disciplines both would gain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Centre for Research into Evidence-Based Practice, Gold Coast, Queensland 4229, Australia. pglaszio@bond.edu.au

ABSTRACT
The considerable gap between what we know from research and what is done in clinical practice is well known. Proposed responses include the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) and Clinical Quality Improvement. EBM has focused more on 'doing the right things'--based on external research evidence--whereas Quality Improvement (QI) has focused more on 'doing things right'--based on local processes. However, these are complementary and in combination direct us how to 'do the right things right'. This article examines the differences and similarities in the two approaches and proposes that by integrating the bedside application, the methodological development and the training of these complementary disciplines both would gain.

Show MeSH