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Multimodality imaging in the evaluation of cardiovascular manifestations of malignancy.

Jiménez-Juan L, Leen J, Wald RM, Nguyen ET, Yan AT, Kirpalani A, Wintersperger BJ, Crean AM - Cardiol Res Pract (2011)

Bottom Line: Up to one third of the population will die as a direct result of cancer.Accurate and timely diagnosis of disease often requires multiple different approaches including the use of modern imaging techniques.Prompt recognition of adverse consequences of some anti-cancer therapies also requires a knowledge of the optimum imaging strategy for the problem at hand.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2C4.

ABSTRACT
Up to one third of the population will die as a direct result of cancer. Accurate and timely diagnosis of disease often requires multiple different approaches including the use of modern imaging techniques. Prompt recognition of adverse consequences of some anti-cancer therapies also requires a knowledge of the optimum imaging strategy for the problem at hand. The purpose of this article is to review not only some of the commoner cardiovascular manifestations of malignancy but also to discuss the strengths, weaknesses and appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging modalities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Epicardial fat. Echocardiography raised concerns about excessive soft tissue anterior to the right ventricle in this patient on long-term steroids.  Bright blood cine (a) and T1-weighted images (b) show circumferential high signal around the heart (asterisks). The appearances suggest an unusual amount of pericardial fat, and this was confirmed on fat-suppressed CMR (c) where there is evidence of signal drop out from the fatty region (asterisks—compare with (b)). MDCT is also very sensitive for fat which it displays as low-density regions of negative Hounsfield attenuation ((d), asterisks). Excessive mediastinal lipomatosis is not uncommon in patients taking steroid preparations.
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fig5: Epicardial fat. Echocardiography raised concerns about excessive soft tissue anterior to the right ventricle in this patient on long-term steroids. Bright blood cine (a) and T1-weighted images (b) show circumferential high signal around the heart (asterisks). The appearances suggest an unusual amount of pericardial fat, and this was confirmed on fat-suppressed CMR (c) where there is evidence of signal drop out from the fatty region (asterisks—compare with (b)). MDCT is also very sensitive for fat which it displays as low-density regions of negative Hounsfield attenuation ((d), asterisks). Excessive mediastinal lipomatosis is not uncommon in patients taking steroid preparations.

Mentions: There is a group of nonneoplastic conditions of the heart and pericardium that can mimic cardiac tumors. These include pericardial cysts, lymphadenopathy, lipomatous hypertrophy of the atrial septum, pericardial fat (Figure 5), caseous calcification of mitral valve [24], coronary artery aneurysm, and thrombus. Despite the lack of malignant potential of these lesions, they can be associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality due to inappropriate treatment. For this reason, their recognition and differentiation from malignant tumors is crucial [25]. The most frequent pseudotumor is thrombus, which is discussed separately below.


Multimodality imaging in the evaluation of cardiovascular manifestations of malignancy.

Jiménez-Juan L, Leen J, Wald RM, Nguyen ET, Yan AT, Kirpalani A, Wintersperger BJ, Crean AM - Cardiol Res Pract (2011)

Epicardial fat. Echocardiography raised concerns about excessive soft tissue anterior to the right ventricle in this patient on long-term steroids.  Bright blood cine (a) and T1-weighted images (b) show circumferential high signal around the heart (asterisks). The appearances suggest an unusual amount of pericardial fat, and this was confirmed on fat-suppressed CMR (c) where there is evidence of signal drop out from the fatty region (asterisks—compare with (b)). MDCT is also very sensitive for fat which it displays as low-density regions of negative Hounsfield attenuation ((d), asterisks). Excessive mediastinal lipomatosis is not uncommon in patients taking steroid preparations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066556&req=5

fig5: Epicardial fat. Echocardiography raised concerns about excessive soft tissue anterior to the right ventricle in this patient on long-term steroids. Bright blood cine (a) and T1-weighted images (b) show circumferential high signal around the heart (asterisks). The appearances suggest an unusual amount of pericardial fat, and this was confirmed on fat-suppressed CMR (c) where there is evidence of signal drop out from the fatty region (asterisks—compare with (b)). MDCT is also very sensitive for fat which it displays as low-density regions of negative Hounsfield attenuation ((d), asterisks). Excessive mediastinal lipomatosis is not uncommon in patients taking steroid preparations.
Mentions: There is a group of nonneoplastic conditions of the heart and pericardium that can mimic cardiac tumors. These include pericardial cysts, lymphadenopathy, lipomatous hypertrophy of the atrial septum, pericardial fat (Figure 5), caseous calcification of mitral valve [24], coronary artery aneurysm, and thrombus. Despite the lack of malignant potential of these lesions, they can be associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality due to inappropriate treatment. For this reason, their recognition and differentiation from malignant tumors is crucial [25]. The most frequent pseudotumor is thrombus, which is discussed separately below.

Bottom Line: Up to one third of the population will die as a direct result of cancer.Accurate and timely diagnosis of disease often requires multiple different approaches including the use of modern imaging techniques.Prompt recognition of adverse consequences of some anti-cancer therapies also requires a knowledge of the optimum imaging strategy for the problem at hand.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2C4.

ABSTRACT
Up to one third of the population will die as a direct result of cancer. Accurate and timely diagnosis of disease often requires multiple different approaches including the use of modern imaging techniques. Prompt recognition of adverse consequences of some anti-cancer therapies also requires a knowledge of the optimum imaging strategy for the problem at hand. The purpose of this article is to review not only some of the commoner cardiovascular manifestations of malignancy but also to discuss the strengths, weaknesses and appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging modalities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus