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Rehabilitating a brain with Alzheimer's: a proposal.

Aranda-Abreu GE, Hernández-Aguilar ME, Manzo Denes J, García Hernández LI, Herrera Rivero M - Clin Interv Aging (2011)

Bottom Line: In spite of the large amount of research going on around the globe and all the information now available about AD, there is still no origin or triggering process known so far.Drugs approved for the treatment of AD include tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine.These may delay or slow down the degenerative process for a while, but they can neither stop nor reverse its progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Neurobiología, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Mexico. garanda@uv.mx

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, originating sporadically in the population aged over 65 years, and advanced age is the principal risk factor leading to AD development. In spite of the large amount of research going on around the globe and all the information now available about AD, there is still no origin or triggering process known so far. Drugs approved for the treatment of AD include tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. These may delay or slow down the degenerative process for a while, but they can neither stop nor reverse its progression. Because that this might be due to a lack of effect of these drugs on degenerating neurons, even when they are able to potentiate the brain in nondegenerative conditions, we propose here an alternative therapy consisting of initial repair of neuronal membranes followed by conventional drug therapies. The rehabilitation of neurons in a degeneration process would enable the drugs to act more effectively on them and improve the effects of treatment in AD patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed experiment to probe the alternative therapy.
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f3-cia-6-053: Proposed experiment to probe the alternative therapy.

Mentions: We believe this rehabilitating therapy in combination with drug treatment gives us a good possibility for improving the quality of life of both AD patients and their relatives, who also suffer the consequences of the disease. We propose an experimental strategy to evaluate the effects of this therapy (Figure 3). Of course, this should be tested in more AD patients in the near future.


Rehabilitating a brain with Alzheimer's: a proposal.

Aranda-Abreu GE, Hernández-Aguilar ME, Manzo Denes J, García Hernández LI, Herrera Rivero M - Clin Interv Aging (2011)

Proposed experiment to probe the alternative therapy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066253&req=5

f3-cia-6-053: Proposed experiment to probe the alternative therapy.
Mentions: We believe this rehabilitating therapy in combination with drug treatment gives us a good possibility for improving the quality of life of both AD patients and their relatives, who also suffer the consequences of the disease. We propose an experimental strategy to evaluate the effects of this therapy (Figure 3). Of course, this should be tested in more AD patients in the near future.

Bottom Line: In spite of the large amount of research going on around the globe and all the information now available about AD, there is still no origin or triggering process known so far.Drugs approved for the treatment of AD include tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine.These may delay or slow down the degenerative process for a while, but they can neither stop nor reverse its progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Neurobiología, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Mexico. garanda@uv.mx

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, originating sporadically in the population aged over 65 years, and advanced age is the principal risk factor leading to AD development. In spite of the large amount of research going on around the globe and all the information now available about AD, there is still no origin or triggering process known so far. Drugs approved for the treatment of AD include tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. These may delay or slow down the degenerative process for a while, but they can neither stop nor reverse its progression. Because that this might be due to a lack of effect of these drugs on degenerating neurons, even when they are able to potentiate the brain in nondegenerative conditions, we propose here an alternative therapy consisting of initial repair of neuronal membranes followed by conventional drug therapies. The rehabilitation of neurons in a degeneration process would enable the drugs to act more effectively on them and improve the effects of treatment in AD patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus