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Prevailing negative soil biota effect and no evidence for local adaptation in a widespread Eurasian grass.

Wagner V, Antunes PM, Ristow M, Lechner U, Hensen I - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent.However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biology/Geobotany and Botanical Garden, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Soil biota effects are increasingly accepted as an important driver of the abundance and distribution of plants. While biogeographical studies on alien invasive plant species have indicated coevolution with soil biota in their native distribution range, it is unknown whether adaptation to soil biota varies among populations within the native distribution range. The question of local adaptation between plants and their soil biota has important implications for conservation of biodiversity and may justify the use of seed material from local provenances in restoration campaigns.

Methodology/principal findings: We studied soil biota effects in ten populations of the steppe grass Stipa capillata from two distinct regions, Europe and Asia. We tested for local adaptation at two different scales, both within (ca. 10-80 km) and between (ca. 3300 km) regions, using a reciprocal inoculation experiment in the greenhouse for nine months. Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent. However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.

Conclusions/significance: Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range. Absence of local adaptation points to the possibility of similar rhizosphere biota composition across populations and regions, sufficient gene flow to prevent coevolution, selection in favor of plasticity, or functional redundancy among different soil biota. From the point of view of plant--soil biota interactions, our findings indicate that the current practice of using seeds exclusively from local provenances in ecosystem restoration campaigns may not be justified.

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Map of the study localities.A) Overview of the study regions within the native distribution range of Stipa capillata (grey color). Detailed map of the study regions in (B) Europe and (C) Asia. Population localities are marked as black stars.
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pone-0017580-g001: Map of the study localities.A) Overview of the study regions within the native distribution range of Stipa capillata (grey color). Detailed map of the study regions in (B) Europe and (C) Asia. Population localities are marked as black stars.

Mentions: Stipa capillata L. (Poaceae) is a perennial tussock grass that grows in dry grasslands on nutrient poor, sandy to loamy soil. Its native range covers large areas of Eurasia and, in the core, in the steppes of Russia and Kazakhstan (Figure 1a), it is one of the most common plant species [33]. However, at its north-western range periphery in Central Europe (Figure 1a) S. capillata is rare, isolated and red-listed [34]. The species is recognized by its inflorescence, bearing single stalked florets with a long and naked awn. Flowers are known to be facultative cleistogamous [35]. Caryopses ripen and are dispersed in animal fur or by wind in late August to October. Mycorrhizal colonization in roots of S. capillata was reported from Russia by Mukhin and Betekhtina [36] and from China by Shi et al. [37].


Prevailing negative soil biota effect and no evidence for local adaptation in a widespread Eurasian grass.

Wagner V, Antunes PM, Ristow M, Lechner U, Hensen I - PLoS ONE (2011)

Map of the study localities.A) Overview of the study regions within the native distribution range of Stipa capillata (grey color). Detailed map of the study regions in (B) Europe and (C) Asia. Population localities are marked as black stars.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3066189&req=5

pone-0017580-g001: Map of the study localities.A) Overview of the study regions within the native distribution range of Stipa capillata (grey color). Detailed map of the study regions in (B) Europe and (C) Asia. Population localities are marked as black stars.
Mentions: Stipa capillata L. (Poaceae) is a perennial tussock grass that grows in dry grasslands on nutrient poor, sandy to loamy soil. Its native range covers large areas of Eurasia and, in the core, in the steppes of Russia and Kazakhstan (Figure 1a), it is one of the most common plant species [33]. However, at its north-western range periphery in Central Europe (Figure 1a) S. capillata is rare, isolated and red-listed [34]. The species is recognized by its inflorescence, bearing single stalked florets with a long and naked awn. Flowers are known to be facultative cleistogamous [35]. Caryopses ripen and are dispersed in animal fur or by wind in late August to October. Mycorrhizal colonization in roots of S. capillata was reported from Russia by Mukhin and Betekhtina [36] and from China by Shi et al. [37].

Bottom Line: Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent.However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biology/Geobotany and Botanical Garden, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Soil biota effects are increasingly accepted as an important driver of the abundance and distribution of plants. While biogeographical studies on alien invasive plant species have indicated coevolution with soil biota in their native distribution range, it is unknown whether adaptation to soil biota varies among populations within the native distribution range. The question of local adaptation between plants and their soil biota has important implications for conservation of biodiversity and may justify the use of seed material from local provenances in restoration campaigns.

Methodology/principal findings: We studied soil biota effects in ten populations of the steppe grass Stipa capillata from two distinct regions, Europe and Asia. We tested for local adaptation at two different scales, both within (ca. 10-80 km) and between (ca. 3300 km) regions, using a reciprocal inoculation experiment in the greenhouse for nine months. Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent. However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.

Conclusions/significance: Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range. Absence of local adaptation points to the possibility of similar rhizosphere biota composition across populations and regions, sufficient gene flow to prevent coevolution, selection in favor of plasticity, or functional redundancy among different soil biota. From the point of view of plant--soil biota interactions, our findings indicate that the current practice of using seeds exclusively from local provenances in ecosystem restoration campaigns may not be justified.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus