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Fungal keratitis.

Tuli SS - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Bottom Line: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast.While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center.Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Clinical question: What is the most appropriate management of fungal keratitis?

Results: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast. Voriconazole is rapidly becoming the drug of choice for all fungal keratitis because of its wide spectrum of coverage and increased penetration into the cornea.

Implementation: Repeated debridement of the ulcer is recommended for the penetration of topical medications. While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center. Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endothelial plaque, ring infiltrate, and hypopyon indicating a more advanced infection.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f2-opth-5-275: Endothelial plaque, ring infiltrate, and hypopyon indicating a more advanced infection.

Mentions: Feathery borders, ring infiltrate, endothelial plaque, fibrinoid aqueous, and satellite lesions should raise the suspicion of fungal keratitis (Figure 1). Endothelial plaques or an anterior chamber reaction usually indicate a more severe infection with penetration of fungal elements into the anterior chamber (Figure 2). Response to therapy is usually indicated by blunting of the feathery edges, re-epithelialization, or reduction in the anterior chamber reaction.


Fungal keratitis.

Tuli SS - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Endothelial plaque, ring infiltrate, and hypopyon indicating a more advanced infection.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065567&req=5

f2-opth-5-275: Endothelial plaque, ring infiltrate, and hypopyon indicating a more advanced infection.
Mentions: Feathery borders, ring infiltrate, endothelial plaque, fibrinoid aqueous, and satellite lesions should raise the suspicion of fungal keratitis (Figure 1). Endothelial plaques or an anterior chamber reaction usually indicate a more severe infection with penetration of fungal elements into the anterior chamber (Figure 2). Response to therapy is usually indicated by blunting of the feathery edges, re-epithelialization, or reduction in the anterior chamber reaction.

Bottom Line: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast.While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center.Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Clinical question: What is the most appropriate management of fungal keratitis?

Results: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast. Voriconazole is rapidly becoming the drug of choice for all fungal keratitis because of its wide spectrum of coverage and increased penetration into the cornea.

Implementation: Repeated debridement of the ulcer is recommended for the penetration of topical medications. While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center. Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus