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Pitavastatin: evidence for its place in treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

Alagona P - Core Evid (2010)

Bottom Line: Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, are the most potent pharmacologic agents for lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).Considering the numbers of patients who need LDL-C-lowering therapy and questions of individual tolerance and therapeutic response, having a variety of agents to choose from is beneficial for patient care.This paper presents background information on statin treatment and reviews data regarding a new agent, pitavastatin, which has recently been approved for clinical use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT
Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, are the most potent pharmacologic agents for lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). They have become an accepted standard of care in the treatment of patients with known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (secondary prevention) and also those at increased risk of cardiovascular events. There are currently six statin drugs commercially available in the US. Although they are chemically similar and have the same primary mechanisms of action in lowering TC and LDL-C, there are differences in their efficacy or potency, metabolism, drug-drug interactions, and individual tolerability. Considering the numbers of patients who need LDL-C-lowering therapy and questions of individual tolerance and therapeutic response, having a variety of agents to choose from is beneficial for patient care. This paper presents background information on statin treatment and reviews data regarding a new agent, pitavastatin, which has recently been approved for clinical use.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean percent change in TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG from baseline values with daily dose pitavastatin for 12 weeks: Yellow Bar 1 mg, Orange Bar 2 mg, Gray Bar 4 mg.
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f6-ce-5-091: Mean percent change in TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG from baseline values with daily dose pitavastatin for 12 weeks: Yellow Bar 1 mg, Orange Bar 2 mg, Gray Bar 4 mg.

Mentions: As with all statins, lowering of LDL-C, as well as safety risk, increases in a dose-dependent fashion.46 The greatest percent LDL-C-lowering occurs at the starting dose for all these drugs. Initial LDL-C-lowering effects vary depending on statin potency, and can be anywhere from >20% with the weaker drugs and >40% with more powerful agents. Each incremental dose commonly reduces LDL-C by another 6%–7%. Pitavastatin belongs in the category of potent statins, with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin causing similar lowering of LDL at comparable doses (Table 3). In one of the first dose-finding studies done in Japanese patients with elevated cholesterol, pitavastatin lowered LDL-C after 12 weeks by 34% at 1 mg, 42% at 2 mg, and 47% at 4 mg (Figure 6).47 A Phase III study in Europe revealed mean percent reduction in LDL-C following 12-week administration of pitavastatin 2 mg (n = 315) and 4 mg (n = 298) to be 38% and 45%, respectively, which was comparable with that in the control group taking atorvastatin 10 mg and 20 mg.48 A number of other studies with pitavastatin alone or compared with other statins, including pravastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, consistently reveal potent lowering of LDL-C.49–51 Efficacy was also evaluated in 30 heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients. LDL-C decreased by 40% after eight weeks using pitavastatin 2 mg and by 48% using 4 mg.52


Pitavastatin: evidence for its place in treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

Alagona P - Core Evid (2010)

Mean percent change in TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG from baseline values with daily dose pitavastatin for 12 weeks: Yellow Bar 1 mg, Orange Bar 2 mg, Gray Bar 4 mg.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065553&req=5

f6-ce-5-091: Mean percent change in TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG from baseline values with daily dose pitavastatin for 12 weeks: Yellow Bar 1 mg, Orange Bar 2 mg, Gray Bar 4 mg.
Mentions: As with all statins, lowering of LDL-C, as well as safety risk, increases in a dose-dependent fashion.46 The greatest percent LDL-C-lowering occurs at the starting dose for all these drugs. Initial LDL-C-lowering effects vary depending on statin potency, and can be anywhere from >20% with the weaker drugs and >40% with more powerful agents. Each incremental dose commonly reduces LDL-C by another 6%–7%. Pitavastatin belongs in the category of potent statins, with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin causing similar lowering of LDL at comparable doses (Table 3). In one of the first dose-finding studies done in Japanese patients with elevated cholesterol, pitavastatin lowered LDL-C after 12 weeks by 34% at 1 mg, 42% at 2 mg, and 47% at 4 mg (Figure 6).47 A Phase III study in Europe revealed mean percent reduction in LDL-C following 12-week administration of pitavastatin 2 mg (n = 315) and 4 mg (n = 298) to be 38% and 45%, respectively, which was comparable with that in the control group taking atorvastatin 10 mg and 20 mg.48 A number of other studies with pitavastatin alone or compared with other statins, including pravastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, consistently reveal potent lowering of LDL-C.49–51 Efficacy was also evaluated in 30 heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients. LDL-C decreased by 40% after eight weeks using pitavastatin 2 mg and by 48% using 4 mg.52

Bottom Line: Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, are the most potent pharmacologic agents for lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).Considering the numbers of patients who need LDL-C-lowering therapy and questions of individual tolerance and therapeutic response, having a variety of agents to choose from is beneficial for patient care.This paper presents background information on statin treatment and reviews data regarding a new agent, pitavastatin, which has recently been approved for clinical use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT
Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, are the most potent pharmacologic agents for lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). They have become an accepted standard of care in the treatment of patients with known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (secondary prevention) and also those at increased risk of cardiovascular events. There are currently six statin drugs commercially available in the US. Although they are chemically similar and have the same primary mechanisms of action in lowering TC and LDL-C, there are differences in their efficacy or potency, metabolism, drug-drug interactions, and individual tolerability. Considering the numbers of patients who need LDL-C-lowering therapy and questions of individual tolerance and therapeutic response, having a variety of agents to choose from is beneficial for patient care. This paper presents background information on statin treatment and reviews data regarding a new agent, pitavastatin, which has recently been approved for clinical use.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus