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The use of herbal medicines by people with cancer: a cross-sectional survey.

Damery S, Gratus C, Grieve R, Warmington S, Jones J, Routledge P, Greenfield S, Dowswell G, Sherriff J, Wilson S - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Bottom Line: Users were more likely to be affluent, female, and aged under 50 years.A validation data set, derived from a survey of oncology patients in Birmingham (n=541) with differing socioeconomic characteristics showed no significant difference in estimated prevalence (16.6%; 95% CI: 11.9-22.2).Understanding the self-medication behaviours of these individuals is essential if health-care professionals are to support treatment adherence and avoid unwanted pharmacological interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Clinical Sciences, School of Health and Population Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. s.l.damery@bham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: A large proportion of cancer patients are estimated to use herbal medicines, but data to substantiate this are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of herbal medicine use among cancer patients in the West Midlands, and determine the characteristics predicting herbal medicine use.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of oncology patients (n=1498) being followed up at a hospital in Coventry was undertaken. Recipients were asked about herbal medicine use since their cancer diagnosis, and the association between sociodemographic and cancer-related characteristics and herbal medicine use was evaluated.

Results: A total of 1134 responses were received (75.7%). The prevalence of herbal medicine use was 19.7% (95% CI: 17.4-22.1; n=223). Users were more likely to be affluent, female, and aged under 50 years. Usage increased with time since cancer diagnosis (X(2) for trend=4.63; P=0.031). A validation data set, derived from a survey of oncology patients in Birmingham (n=541) with differing socioeconomic characteristics showed no significant difference in estimated prevalence (16.6%; 95% CI: 11.9-22.2).

Conclusion: A substantial number of people with cancer are likely to be taking herbal medicines. Understanding the self-medication behaviours of these individuals is essential if health-care professionals are to support treatment adherence and avoid unwanted pharmacological interactions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Consort diagram detailing surveys mailed and returned.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Consort diagram detailing surveys mailed and returned.

Mentions: Of 1498 surveys distributed, 27 (1.8%) were returned blank, indicating that the recipient did not wish to receive a reminder. A further 337 survey recipients (22.5%) did not respond to either the initial or reminder mailings, giving a total of 1134 useable responses (response rate 75.7%), Figure 1.


The use of herbal medicines by people with cancer: a cross-sectional survey.

Damery S, Gratus C, Grieve R, Warmington S, Jones J, Routledge P, Greenfield S, Dowswell G, Sherriff J, Wilson S - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Consort diagram detailing surveys mailed and returned.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065283&req=5

fig1: Consort diagram detailing surveys mailed and returned.
Mentions: Of 1498 surveys distributed, 27 (1.8%) were returned blank, indicating that the recipient did not wish to receive a reminder. A further 337 survey recipients (22.5%) did not respond to either the initial or reminder mailings, giving a total of 1134 useable responses (response rate 75.7%), Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Users were more likely to be affluent, female, and aged under 50 years.A validation data set, derived from a survey of oncology patients in Birmingham (n=541) with differing socioeconomic characteristics showed no significant difference in estimated prevalence (16.6%; 95% CI: 11.9-22.2).Understanding the self-medication behaviours of these individuals is essential if health-care professionals are to support treatment adherence and avoid unwanted pharmacological interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Clinical Sciences, School of Health and Population Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. s.l.damery@bham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: A large proportion of cancer patients are estimated to use herbal medicines, but data to substantiate this are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of herbal medicine use among cancer patients in the West Midlands, and determine the characteristics predicting herbal medicine use.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of oncology patients (n=1498) being followed up at a hospital in Coventry was undertaken. Recipients were asked about herbal medicine use since their cancer diagnosis, and the association between sociodemographic and cancer-related characteristics and herbal medicine use was evaluated.

Results: A total of 1134 responses were received (75.7%). The prevalence of herbal medicine use was 19.7% (95% CI: 17.4-22.1; n=223). Users were more likely to be affluent, female, and aged under 50 years. Usage increased with time since cancer diagnosis (X(2) for trend=4.63; P=0.031). A validation data set, derived from a survey of oncology patients in Birmingham (n=541) with differing socioeconomic characteristics showed no significant difference in estimated prevalence (16.6%; 95% CI: 11.9-22.2).

Conclusion: A substantial number of people with cancer are likely to be taking herbal medicines. Understanding the self-medication behaviours of these individuals is essential if health-care professionals are to support treatment adherence and avoid unwanted pharmacological interactions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus