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Anticancer drugs from marine flora: an overview.

Sithranga Boopathy N, Kathiresan K - J Oncol (2011)

Bottom Line: The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides.The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities.In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Marine floras, such as bacteria, actinobacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, microalgae, seaweeds, mangroves, and other halophytes are extremely important oceanic resources, constituting over 90% of the oceanic biomass. They are taxonomically diverse, largely productive, biologically active, and chemically unique offering a great scope for discovery of new anticancer drugs. The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides. The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities. The phytochemicals possibly activate macrophages, induce apoptosis, and prevent oxidative damage of DNA, thereby controlling carcinogenesis. In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds. Hence, this paper reviews the works so far conducted on this aspect with a view to provide a baseline information for promoting the marine flora-based anticancer research in the present context of increasing cancer incidence, deprived of the cheaper, safer, and potent medicines to challenge the dreadful human disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anticancer polysaccharides from marine floras.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Anticancer polysaccharides from marine floras.

Mentions: Terrestrial and marine polyphenols are similar in some respects, but different fundamentally in their chemical structures. Terrestrial polyphenols are polymers based on flavonoids or gallic acids. Marine algal polyphenols, phlorotannins, which are only known in brown algae, are restricted to polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) [117]. Six phlorotannins have been detected by HPLC analysis in the brown seaweeds, Eisenia bicyclis and Eclonia kurome, and they are phloroglucinol (0.7%), an unknown phloroglucinol tetramer (MW 478, 3.4%), eckol (7.5%), phlorofucofuroeckol A (21.6%), dieckol (21.9%), 8,8′-bieckol (24.0%), and other unknown compounds (20.9%), in E. bicyclis, and these compounds are also present in E. kurome, respectively, at concentrations of 2.2, 0.6, 8.5, 27.6, 23.6, 6.8, and 31.7% (Figures 2(b), 2(c), 2(d), 2(e), and 2(f)). The crude phlorotannins extracted from brown algae have inhibitory effects on HAase [118]. The half maximal inhibition (IC50) values of crude phlorotannins of E. bicyclis and E. kurome, two terrestrial polyphenols (catechin, EGCG), inhibit four times stronger than that by an anti-allergic drug (DSCG) [119].


Anticancer drugs from marine flora: an overview.

Sithranga Boopathy N, Kathiresan K - J Oncol (2011)

Anticancer polysaccharides from marine floras.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065217&req=5

fig2: Anticancer polysaccharides from marine floras.
Mentions: Terrestrial and marine polyphenols are similar in some respects, but different fundamentally in their chemical structures. Terrestrial polyphenols are polymers based on flavonoids or gallic acids. Marine algal polyphenols, phlorotannins, which are only known in brown algae, are restricted to polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) [117]. Six phlorotannins have been detected by HPLC analysis in the brown seaweeds, Eisenia bicyclis and Eclonia kurome, and they are phloroglucinol (0.7%), an unknown phloroglucinol tetramer (MW 478, 3.4%), eckol (7.5%), phlorofucofuroeckol A (21.6%), dieckol (21.9%), 8,8′-bieckol (24.0%), and other unknown compounds (20.9%), in E. bicyclis, and these compounds are also present in E. kurome, respectively, at concentrations of 2.2, 0.6, 8.5, 27.6, 23.6, 6.8, and 31.7% (Figures 2(b), 2(c), 2(d), 2(e), and 2(f)). The crude phlorotannins extracted from brown algae have inhibitory effects on HAase [118]. The half maximal inhibition (IC50) values of crude phlorotannins of E. bicyclis and E. kurome, two terrestrial polyphenols (catechin, EGCG), inhibit four times stronger than that by an anti-allergic drug (DSCG) [119].

Bottom Line: The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides.The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities.In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Marine floras, such as bacteria, actinobacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, microalgae, seaweeds, mangroves, and other halophytes are extremely important oceanic resources, constituting over 90% of the oceanic biomass. They are taxonomically diverse, largely productive, biologically active, and chemically unique offering a great scope for discovery of new anticancer drugs. The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides. The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities. The phytochemicals possibly activate macrophages, induce apoptosis, and prevent oxidative damage of DNA, thereby controlling carcinogenesis. In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds. Hence, this paper reviews the works so far conducted on this aspect with a view to provide a baseline information for promoting the marine flora-based anticancer research in the present context of increasing cancer incidence, deprived of the cheaper, safer, and potent medicines to challenge the dreadful human disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus