Limits...
Applicability of three alternative instruments for food authenticity analysis: GMO identification.

Burrell A, Foy C, Burns M - Biotechnol Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: Ensuring foods are correctly labelled for ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an issue facing manufacturers, retailers, and enforcement agencies.This study examines the fitness for purpose of the application of three laboratory electrophoresis instruments (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100, Lab901 TapeStation, and Shimadzu MCE-202 MultiNA) for the detection of GMOs using PCR based on a previously validated protocol.Whilst minor differences in the performance characteristics of bias and precision were observed, all three instruments demonstrated their applicability in using this protocol for screening of GMO ingredients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Cell Biology, LGC, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
Ensuring foods are correctly labelled for ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an issue facing manufacturers, retailers, and enforcement agencies. DNA approaches for the determination of food authenticitys often use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products can be detected using capillary or gel electrophoresis. This study examines the fitness for purpose of the application of three laboratory electrophoresis instruments (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100, Lab901 TapeStation, and Shimadzu MCE-202 MultiNA) for the detection of GMOs using PCR based on a previously validated protocol. Whilst minor differences in the performance characteristics of bias and precision were observed, all three instruments demonstrated their applicability in using this protocol for screening of GMO ingredients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bias associated with the amplicons from the positive controls. Figure shows the bias (trueness) associated with the amplicons from the positive controls, across the three instruments of the Bioanalyzer 2100, TapeStation, and MultiNA. The bias is based on the difference between the observed amplicon size per instrument, compared with the theoretical amplicon size based on the sequence information. NOS represents the combined NOS terminator/CaMV 35s promoter amplicon. Bias is calculated on the measurement response of base pairs (bp).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065168&req=5

fig2: Bias associated with the amplicons from the positive controls. Figure shows the bias (trueness) associated with the amplicons from the positive controls, across the three instruments of the Bioanalyzer 2100, TapeStation, and MultiNA. The bias is based on the difference between the observed amplicon size per instrument, compared with the theoretical amplicon size based on the sequence information. NOS represents the combined NOS terminator/CaMV 35s promoter amplicon. Bias is calculated on the measurement response of base pairs (bp).

Mentions: Table 1 shows the amplicon sizes associated with the positive control. The theoretical size refers to the theoretical number of base pairs associated with each amplicon based on available DNA sequence information. This theoretical amplicon size was used as a measure of the bias (trueness) associated with the results produced by all three instruments and was calculated across all replicate runs within the experiment (Figure 2).


Applicability of three alternative instruments for food authenticity analysis: GMO identification.

Burrell A, Foy C, Burns M - Biotechnol Res Int (2011)

Bias associated with the amplicons from the positive controls. Figure shows the bias (trueness) associated with the amplicons from the positive controls, across the three instruments of the Bioanalyzer 2100, TapeStation, and MultiNA. The bias is based on the difference between the observed amplicon size per instrument, compared with the theoretical amplicon size based on the sequence information. NOS represents the combined NOS terminator/CaMV 35s promoter amplicon. Bias is calculated on the measurement response of base pairs (bp).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065168&req=5

fig2: Bias associated with the amplicons from the positive controls. Figure shows the bias (trueness) associated with the amplicons from the positive controls, across the three instruments of the Bioanalyzer 2100, TapeStation, and MultiNA. The bias is based on the difference between the observed amplicon size per instrument, compared with the theoretical amplicon size based on the sequence information. NOS represents the combined NOS terminator/CaMV 35s promoter amplicon. Bias is calculated on the measurement response of base pairs (bp).
Mentions: Table 1 shows the amplicon sizes associated with the positive control. The theoretical size refers to the theoretical number of base pairs associated with each amplicon based on available DNA sequence information. This theoretical amplicon size was used as a measure of the bias (trueness) associated with the results produced by all three instruments and was calculated across all replicate runs within the experiment (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Ensuring foods are correctly labelled for ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an issue facing manufacturers, retailers, and enforcement agencies.This study examines the fitness for purpose of the application of three laboratory electrophoresis instruments (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100, Lab901 TapeStation, and Shimadzu MCE-202 MultiNA) for the detection of GMOs using PCR based on a previously validated protocol.Whilst minor differences in the performance characteristics of bias and precision were observed, all three instruments demonstrated their applicability in using this protocol for screening of GMO ingredients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Cell Biology, LGC, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
Ensuring foods are correctly labelled for ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an issue facing manufacturers, retailers, and enforcement agencies. DNA approaches for the determination of food authenticitys often use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products can be detected using capillary or gel electrophoresis. This study examines the fitness for purpose of the application of three laboratory electrophoresis instruments (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100, Lab901 TapeStation, and Shimadzu MCE-202 MultiNA) for the detection of GMOs using PCR based on a previously validated protocol. Whilst minor differences in the performance characteristics of bias and precision were observed, all three instruments demonstrated their applicability in using this protocol for screening of GMO ingredients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus