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Resting-state glucose metabolism level is associated with the regional pattern of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

Shin J, Tsui W, Li Y, Lee SY, Kim SJ, Cho SJ, Kim YB, de Leon MJ - Int J Alzheimers Dis (2011)

Bottom Line: We confirmed that resting glucose metabolism within the posterior components of the brain's default network is high in normal elderly subjects and low in AD patients, which is partially in agreement with the regional pattern of PIB uptake within the default network of AD patients.However, in several regions outside the default network, glucose metabolism was high in normal elderly subjects but was not depressed in AD patients, who exhibited significantly increased PIB uptakes in these regions.In contrast, the level of resting glucose metabolism in the default network and in regions outside the default network in normal elderly subjects was significantly correlated with the level of regional PIB uptake in AD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon 405-760, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
It has been suggested that glucose metabolism within the brain's default network is directly associated with-and may even cause-the amyloid pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we performed 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and [(11)C]-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET) on cognitively normal elderly subjects and on AD patients and conducted quantitative regional analysis of FDG- and PIB-PET images using an automated region of interest technique. We confirmed that resting glucose metabolism within the posterior components of the brain's default network is high in normal elderly subjects and low in AD patients, which is partially in agreement with the regional pattern of PIB uptake within the default network of AD patients. However, in several regions outside the default network, glucose metabolism was high in normal elderly subjects but was not depressed in AD patients, who exhibited significantly increased PIB uptakes in these regions. In contrast, the level of resting glucose metabolism in the default network and in regions outside the default network in normal elderly subjects was significantly correlated with the level of regional PIB uptake in AD patients. These results are discussed with experimental evidence suggesting that beta amyloid production and amyloid precursor protein regulation are dependent on neuronal activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FDG and PIB-PET images of a representative normal elderly subject and an Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient. (a) Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of FDG in a normal 65-year-old man (left upper panel) and a 60-year-old woman with AD (right upper panel). (b) PET imaging of PIB in the same normal subject (left lower panel) and the same AD patient (right lower panel).
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fig1: FDG and PIB-PET images of a representative normal elderly subject and an Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient. (a) Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of FDG in a normal 65-year-old man (left upper panel) and a 60-year-old woman with AD (right upper panel). (b) PET imaging of PIB in the same normal subject (left lower panel) and the same AD patient (right lower panel).

Mentions: The upper left panel of Figure 1 shows an FDG-PET image of a representative normal elderly subject. The posterior components of the default network (the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus) exhibited higher resting glucose metabolism than most other brain regions. However, it should be noted that the high glucose metabolism was not restricted to the default network because the primary visual cortex also exhibited high resting glucose metabolism (Figure 1, upper left panel). The FDG-PET image from a representative AD patient (Figure 1, upper right panel) shows hypometabolism in the posterior cingulated cortex and the precuneus. In contrast, the visual cortex of the AD patient did not show hypometabolism (Figure 1, upper right panel). On the other hand, a PIB-PET image from the same AD patient showed increased PIB uptake not only in parts of the default network such as the posterior cingulated cortex and the precuneus, but also in regions outside the default network (e.g., the visual cortex) (Figure 1, lower right panel). These observations show that regions outside the default network may exhibit high resting glucose metabolism and amyloid pathology.


Resting-state glucose metabolism level is associated with the regional pattern of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

Shin J, Tsui W, Li Y, Lee SY, Kim SJ, Cho SJ, Kim YB, de Leon MJ - Int J Alzheimers Dis (2011)

FDG and PIB-PET images of a representative normal elderly subject and an Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient. (a) Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of FDG in a normal 65-year-old man (left upper panel) and a 60-year-old woman with AD (right upper panel). (b) PET imaging of PIB in the same normal subject (left lower panel) and the same AD patient (right lower panel).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065040&req=5

fig1: FDG and PIB-PET images of a representative normal elderly subject and an Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient. (a) Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of FDG in a normal 65-year-old man (left upper panel) and a 60-year-old woman with AD (right upper panel). (b) PET imaging of PIB in the same normal subject (left lower panel) and the same AD patient (right lower panel).
Mentions: The upper left panel of Figure 1 shows an FDG-PET image of a representative normal elderly subject. The posterior components of the default network (the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus) exhibited higher resting glucose metabolism than most other brain regions. However, it should be noted that the high glucose metabolism was not restricted to the default network because the primary visual cortex also exhibited high resting glucose metabolism (Figure 1, upper left panel). The FDG-PET image from a representative AD patient (Figure 1, upper right panel) shows hypometabolism in the posterior cingulated cortex and the precuneus. In contrast, the visual cortex of the AD patient did not show hypometabolism (Figure 1, upper right panel). On the other hand, a PIB-PET image from the same AD patient showed increased PIB uptake not only in parts of the default network such as the posterior cingulated cortex and the precuneus, but also in regions outside the default network (e.g., the visual cortex) (Figure 1, lower right panel). These observations show that regions outside the default network may exhibit high resting glucose metabolism and amyloid pathology.

Bottom Line: We confirmed that resting glucose metabolism within the posterior components of the brain's default network is high in normal elderly subjects and low in AD patients, which is partially in agreement with the regional pattern of PIB uptake within the default network of AD patients.However, in several regions outside the default network, glucose metabolism was high in normal elderly subjects but was not depressed in AD patients, who exhibited significantly increased PIB uptakes in these regions.In contrast, the level of resting glucose metabolism in the default network and in regions outside the default network in normal elderly subjects was significantly correlated with the level of regional PIB uptake in AD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon 405-760, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
It has been suggested that glucose metabolism within the brain's default network is directly associated with-and may even cause-the amyloid pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we performed 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and [(11)C]-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET) on cognitively normal elderly subjects and on AD patients and conducted quantitative regional analysis of FDG- and PIB-PET images using an automated region of interest technique. We confirmed that resting glucose metabolism within the posterior components of the brain's default network is high in normal elderly subjects and low in AD patients, which is partially in agreement with the regional pattern of PIB uptake within the default network of AD patients. However, in several regions outside the default network, glucose metabolism was high in normal elderly subjects but was not depressed in AD patients, who exhibited significantly increased PIB uptakes in these regions. In contrast, the level of resting glucose metabolism in the default network and in regions outside the default network in normal elderly subjects was significantly correlated with the level of regional PIB uptake in AD patients. These results are discussed with experimental evidence suggesting that beta amyloid production and amyloid precursor protein regulation are dependent on neuronal activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus