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Female-headed households contending with AIDS-related hardship in rural South Africa.

Schatz E, Madhavan S, Williams J - Health Place (2010)

Bottom Line: As female-headed households increase in number, we need to better understand how female-heads in poor rural areas contend with AIDS related challenges.We find considerable heterogeneity among rural female-headed households and their access to resources to combat AIDS-related hardship.Our findings have important policy implications both in terms of identifying individual and household vulnerabilities as well as leveraging the potential for resilience for female-heads in rural South African communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Missouri, 420 Lewis Hall, Columbia, MO 65203, USA. schatzej@health.missouri.edu

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Agincourt Unit Research Site in pre-1994 South Africa.
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f0005: Agincourt Unit Research Site in pre-1994 South Africa.

Mentions: Even though apartheid was dismantled in 1990, the lack of rural development during apartheid continues to affect former homelands through endemic poverty, underdeveloped employment opportunities, and poor access to health and welfare services (Coovadia et al., 2009), resulting in continued streams of circular migration (Allison and Harpham, 2002; Campbell et al., 2008; Feldacker et al., 2010). Fig. 1 shows the geographic separation between the former homelands and the major urban centers. The rural research site for this study (Agincourt) is situated in the former homeland of Gazankulu, approximately 500 km northeast of Johannesburg.


Female-headed households contending with AIDS-related hardship in rural South Africa.

Schatz E, Madhavan S, Williams J - Health Place (2010)

Agincourt Unit Research Site in pre-1994 South Africa.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3065005&req=5

f0005: Agincourt Unit Research Site in pre-1994 South Africa.
Mentions: Even though apartheid was dismantled in 1990, the lack of rural development during apartheid continues to affect former homelands through endemic poverty, underdeveloped employment opportunities, and poor access to health and welfare services (Coovadia et al., 2009), resulting in continued streams of circular migration (Allison and Harpham, 2002; Campbell et al., 2008; Feldacker et al., 2010). Fig. 1 shows the geographic separation between the former homelands and the major urban centers. The rural research site for this study (Agincourt) is situated in the former homeland of Gazankulu, approximately 500 km northeast of Johannesburg.

Bottom Line: As female-headed households increase in number, we need to better understand how female-heads in poor rural areas contend with AIDS related challenges.We find considerable heterogeneity among rural female-headed households and their access to resources to combat AIDS-related hardship.Our findings have important policy implications both in terms of identifying individual and household vulnerabilities as well as leveraging the potential for resilience for female-heads in rural South African communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Missouri, 420 Lewis Hall, Columbia, MO 65203, USA. schatzej@health.missouri.edu

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus