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Are quantum dots ready for in vivo imaging in human subjects?

Cai W, Hsu AR, Li ZB, Chen X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2007)

Bottom Line: Numerous studies on QDs have resulted in major advancements in QD surface modification, coating, biocompatibility, sensitivity, multiplexing, targeting specificity, as well as important findings regarding toxicity and applicability.For in vitro applications, QDs can be used in place of traditional organic fluorescent dyes in virtually any system, outperforming organic dyes in the majority of cases.With new advances in QD technology such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, synthesis of smaller size non-Cd based QDs, improved surface coating and conjugation, and multifunctional probes for multimodality imaging, it is likely that human applications of QDs will soon be possible in a clinical setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Molecular Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nanotechnology has the potential to profoundly transform the nature of cancer diagnosis and cancer patient management in the future. Over the past decade, quantum dots (QDs) have become one of the fastest growing areas of research in nanotechnology. QDs are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles suitable for multiplexed in vitro and in vivo imaging. Numerous studies on QDs have resulted in major advancements in QD surface modification, coating, biocompatibility, sensitivity, multiplexing, targeting specificity, as well as important findings regarding toxicity and applicability. For in vitro applications, QDs can be used in place of traditional organic fluorescent dyes in virtually any system, outperforming organic dyes in the majority of cases. In vivo targeted tumor imaging with biocompatible QDs has recently become possible in mouse models. With new advances in QD technology such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, synthesis of smaller size non-Cd based QDs, improved surface coating and conjugation, and multifunctional probes for multimodality imaging, it is likely that human applications of QDs will soon be possible in a clinical setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A QD-based probe for both fluorescence imaging and MRI. From [204]
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Figure 12: A QD-based probe for both fluorescence imaging and MRI. From [204]

Mentions: A series of core/shell CdSe/Zn1−xMnxS nanoparticles have been synthesized for use in both optical imaging and MRI [200]. Mn2+ content was in the range of 0.6–6.2% and varies with the thickness of the shell or amount of Mn2+ introduced to the reaction. The quantum yield and Mn2+ concentration in the nanoparticles were sufficient to produce contrast for both modalities at a relatively low concentration. Bifunctional nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles and CdSe QDs have been synthesized [201]. QDs can be coated with paramagnetic and pegylated lipids for use as detectable and targeted probes with MRI [202]. These QDs are useful as dualmodality contrast agents due to their high relaxivity and ability to retain their optical properties. Several other QD-based probes for both fluorescence imaging and MRI have also been reported (Fig. 12) [202-204]. Polymer-coated Fe2O3 cores overcoated with a CdSe-ZnS QD shell and functionalized with antibodies have been used to magnetically capture breast cancer cells and view them with fluorescence imaging [205]. Magnetic QDs composed of CdS-FePt have also been synthesized [206].


Are quantum dots ready for in vivo imaging in human subjects?

Cai W, Hsu AR, Li ZB, Chen X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2007)

A QD-based probe for both fluorescence imaging and MRI. From [204]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3050636&req=5

Figure 12: A QD-based probe for both fluorescence imaging and MRI. From [204]
Mentions: A series of core/shell CdSe/Zn1−xMnxS nanoparticles have been synthesized for use in both optical imaging and MRI [200]. Mn2+ content was in the range of 0.6–6.2% and varies with the thickness of the shell or amount of Mn2+ introduced to the reaction. The quantum yield and Mn2+ concentration in the nanoparticles were sufficient to produce contrast for both modalities at a relatively low concentration. Bifunctional nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles and CdSe QDs have been synthesized [201]. QDs can be coated with paramagnetic and pegylated lipids for use as detectable and targeted probes with MRI [202]. These QDs are useful as dualmodality contrast agents due to their high relaxivity and ability to retain their optical properties. Several other QD-based probes for both fluorescence imaging and MRI have also been reported (Fig. 12) [202-204]. Polymer-coated Fe2O3 cores overcoated with a CdSe-ZnS QD shell and functionalized with antibodies have been used to magnetically capture breast cancer cells and view them with fluorescence imaging [205]. Magnetic QDs composed of CdS-FePt have also been synthesized [206].

Bottom Line: Numerous studies on QDs have resulted in major advancements in QD surface modification, coating, biocompatibility, sensitivity, multiplexing, targeting specificity, as well as important findings regarding toxicity and applicability.For in vitro applications, QDs can be used in place of traditional organic fluorescent dyes in virtually any system, outperforming organic dyes in the majority of cases.With new advances in QD technology such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, synthesis of smaller size non-Cd based QDs, improved surface coating and conjugation, and multifunctional probes for multimodality imaging, it is likely that human applications of QDs will soon be possible in a clinical setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Molecular Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nanotechnology has the potential to profoundly transform the nature of cancer diagnosis and cancer patient management in the future. Over the past decade, quantum dots (QDs) have become one of the fastest growing areas of research in nanotechnology. QDs are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles suitable for multiplexed in vitro and in vivo imaging. Numerous studies on QDs have resulted in major advancements in QD surface modification, coating, biocompatibility, sensitivity, multiplexing, targeting specificity, as well as important findings regarding toxicity and applicability. For in vitro applications, QDs can be used in place of traditional organic fluorescent dyes in virtually any system, outperforming organic dyes in the majority of cases. In vivo targeted tumor imaging with biocompatible QDs has recently become possible in mouse models. With new advances in QD technology such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, synthesis of smaller size non-Cd based QDs, improved surface coating and conjugation, and multifunctional probes for multimodality imaging, it is likely that human applications of QDs will soon be possible in a clinical setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus