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Research output on primary care in Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States: bibliometric analysis.

Glanville J, Kendrick T, McNally R, Campbell J, Hobbs FD - BMJ (2011)

Bottom Line: For authors with the highest proportion of publications cited at least five times, the best performers came from the United States (n=5), United Kingdom (n=4), and the Netherlands (n=2).The mean Hirsch index (measure of a researcher's productivity and impact of the published work) was 14 for the Netherlands, 13 for the United Kingdom, 12 for the United States, 7 for Canada, 4 for Australia, and 3 for Germany.This international comparison of the volume and citation rates of papers by researchers from primary care consistently placed UK researchers among the best performers internationally.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: York Health Economics Consortium, University of York.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare the volume and quality of original research in primary care published by researchers from primary care in the United Kingdom against five countries with well established academic primary care.

Design: Bibliometric analysis.

Setting: United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands. Studies reviewed Research publications relevant to comprehensive primary care and authored by researchers from primary care, recorded in Medline and Embase, with publication dates 2001-7 inclusive.

Main outcome measures: Volume of published activity of generalist primary care researchers and the quality of the research output by those publishing the most using citation metrics: numbers of cited papers, proportion of cited papers, and mean citation scores.

Results: 82,169 papers published between 2001 and 2007 in the six countries were classified as research on primary care. In a 15% pragmatic random sample of these records, 40% of research on primary care from the United Kingdom and 46% from the Netherlands was authored by researchers employed in a primary care setting or employed in academic departments of primary care. The 141 researchers with the highest volume of publications reporting research findings published between 2001 and 2007 (inclusive) authored or part authored 8.3% of the total sample of papers. For authors with the highest proportion of publications cited at least five times, the best performers came from the United States (n=5), United Kingdom (n=4), and the Netherlands (n=2). In the top 10 of authors with the highest proportions of publications achieving 20 or more citations, six were from the United Kingdom and four from the United States. The mean Hirsch index (measure of a researcher's productivity and impact of the published work) was 14 for the Netherlands, 13 for the United Kingdom, 12 for the United States, 7 for Canada, 4 for Australia, and 3 for Germany.

Conclusion: This international comparison of the volume and citation rates of papers by researchers from primary care consistently placed UK researchers among the best performers internationally.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 3 Mean number of research publications by authors from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars gross expenditure on research and development (GERD) and by journal impact factor
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fig3: Fig 3 Mean number of research publications by authors from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars gross expenditure on research and development (GERD) and by journal impact factor

Mentions: On the assumption that publication in journals with higher impact factors is generally seen as desirable and one surrogate for quality, the analysis explored publication patterns in journals with different ranges of impact factors. In terms of the mean number of research reports by researchers from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars of gross expenditure on research and development, the Netherlands achieved the highest mean numbers of publications in journals with an impact factor of 5 and above, and the United Kingdom achieved the highest mean numbers of publications in journals with an impact factor below 5 (fig 3). The United States and Germany had much lower mean numbers of publications in all impact factor categories.


Research output on primary care in Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States: bibliometric analysis.

Glanville J, Kendrick T, McNally R, Campbell J, Hobbs FD - BMJ (2011)

Fig 3 Mean number of research publications by authors from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars gross expenditure on research and development (GERD) and by journal impact factor
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3050436&req=5

fig3: Fig 3 Mean number of research publications by authors from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars gross expenditure on research and development (GERD) and by journal impact factor
Mentions: On the assumption that publication in journals with higher impact factors is generally seen as desirable and one surrogate for quality, the analysis explored publication patterns in journals with different ranges of impact factors. In terms of the mean number of research reports by researchers from primary care (2001-6, 15% sample) per billion dollars of gross expenditure on research and development, the Netherlands achieved the highest mean numbers of publications in journals with an impact factor of 5 and above, and the United Kingdom achieved the highest mean numbers of publications in journals with an impact factor below 5 (fig 3). The United States and Germany had much lower mean numbers of publications in all impact factor categories.

Bottom Line: For authors with the highest proportion of publications cited at least five times, the best performers came from the United States (n=5), United Kingdom (n=4), and the Netherlands (n=2).The mean Hirsch index (measure of a researcher's productivity and impact of the published work) was 14 for the Netherlands, 13 for the United Kingdom, 12 for the United States, 7 for Canada, 4 for Australia, and 3 for Germany.This international comparison of the volume and citation rates of papers by researchers from primary care consistently placed UK researchers among the best performers internationally.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: York Health Economics Consortium, University of York.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare the volume and quality of original research in primary care published by researchers from primary care in the United Kingdom against five countries with well established academic primary care.

Design: Bibliometric analysis.

Setting: United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands. Studies reviewed Research publications relevant to comprehensive primary care and authored by researchers from primary care, recorded in Medline and Embase, with publication dates 2001-7 inclusive.

Main outcome measures: Volume of published activity of generalist primary care researchers and the quality of the research output by those publishing the most using citation metrics: numbers of cited papers, proportion of cited papers, and mean citation scores.

Results: 82,169 papers published between 2001 and 2007 in the six countries were classified as research on primary care. In a 15% pragmatic random sample of these records, 40% of research on primary care from the United Kingdom and 46% from the Netherlands was authored by researchers employed in a primary care setting or employed in academic departments of primary care. The 141 researchers with the highest volume of publications reporting research findings published between 2001 and 2007 (inclusive) authored or part authored 8.3% of the total sample of papers. For authors with the highest proportion of publications cited at least five times, the best performers came from the United States (n=5), United Kingdom (n=4), and the Netherlands (n=2). In the top 10 of authors with the highest proportions of publications achieving 20 or more citations, six were from the United Kingdom and four from the United States. The mean Hirsch index (measure of a researcher's productivity and impact of the published work) was 14 for the Netherlands, 13 for the United Kingdom, 12 for the United States, 7 for Canada, 4 for Australia, and 3 for Germany.

Conclusion: This international comparison of the volume and citation rates of papers by researchers from primary care consistently placed UK researchers among the best performers internationally.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus