Limits...
Dual use issues in the life sciences: challenges and opportunities for education in an emerging area of scientific responsibility.

Bowman K, Husbands JL - CBE Life Sci Educ (2011)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Board on Life Sciences, National Research Council, Washington, DC 20001, USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

As a recent National Research Council (NRC) report notes,Years of research have generated detailed information about the components of the complex systems that characterize life—genes, cells, organisms, ecosystems—and this knowledge has begun to fuse into greater understanding of how all those components work together as systems. … The life sciences have reached a point where a new level of inquiry is possible, a level that builds on the strengths of the traditional research establishment but provides a framework to draw on those strengths and focus them on large questions whose answers would provide many practical benefits. (NRC,, pp. 12–13) In parallel with the excitement generated by the rapid pace and global nature of developments in the life sciences, concerns have grown that these advances have the potential to yield knowledge, tools, and techniques that could be misused for biological weapons or bioterrorism... Additional information and examples are available in the booklet Understanding Biosecurity: Protecting against the Misuse of Science in Today's World, from the NRC's Board on Life Sciences... Researchers also have a responsibility to reflect on how their work and the knowledge they are generating might be used in the broader society. (National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine,, p. 48) There have been increasing calls to incorporate discussions about the potential security implications of scientific developments into the education of students and practitioners at multiple educational levels (American Association for the Advancement of Science, ; Federation of American Societies in Experimental Biology, ; NRC, )... This was followed in 1976 by the National Institutes of Health–issued Guidelines for Research Involving rDNA Molecules. education about dual use issues provides good opportunities to engage students in conversations about the intersection of science and society... It highlights the global nature of scientific research and can be adapted to the needs of multiple educational settings and multiple groups, from undergraduate students to faculty... The U.S. Department of State asked the IAP: The Global Network of Science AcademiesFormerly the InterAcademy Panel on International Issues; additional information may be found at www.interacademies.net. to organize a workshop about ways to educate life scientists on dual use issues... Two important themes arose from the workshop: First, to engage the life sciences community, these security issues would best be approached in the context of responsible conduct of research, that is, within the wide array of issues that the community addresses to fulfill its responsibilities to society... Second, education about dual use issues would benefit from the insights of the “science of learning,” the growing body of research about how individuals learn at various stages of their lives and careers and the most effective methods for teaching them (e.g., NRC, ; Eshel, )... Given the diversity of fields, interests, and experiences across the life sciences, making dual use issues relevant to all students is a challenge... Further, it is important to reach out to other disciplines that are becoming an increasingly important part of life sciences research—physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering... The committee found that tailoring educational materials to suit the needs of these different groups could help reach wider audiences... Channels through which life scientists already receive exposure to issues of responsible conduct, like biosafety, bioethics, and research ethics, offer the greatest opportunity to reach the largest and most diverse range of students and professionals, the committee found... Thus, rather than trying to cram yet more content into courses, educators need to consider carefully how various types of content can be integrated to improve learning (e.g., Labov and Huddleston, ), contributing to the broad range of learning goals for a course (e.g., Handelsman et al., )... On the basis of the findings and conclusions described briefly above, the committee proposed the following specific actions to improve education on dual use issues:Develop an international open access repository of materials that can be adapted for the local context.

Show MeSH
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3046886&req=5


Dual use issues in the life sciences: challenges and opportunities for education in an emerging area of scientific responsibility.

Bowman K, Husbands JL - CBE Life Sci Educ (2011)

© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3046886&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Board on Life Sciences, National Research Council, Washington, DC 20001, USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

As a recent National Research Council (NRC) report notes,Years of research have generated detailed information about the components of the complex systems that characterize life—genes, cells, organisms, ecosystems—and this knowledge has begun to fuse into greater understanding of how all those components work together as systems. … The life sciences have reached a point where a new level of inquiry is possible, a level that builds on the strengths of the traditional research establishment but provides a framework to draw on those strengths and focus them on large questions whose answers would provide many practical benefits. (NRC,, pp. 12–13) In parallel with the excitement generated by the rapid pace and global nature of developments in the life sciences, concerns have grown that these advances have the potential to yield knowledge, tools, and techniques that could be misused for biological weapons or bioterrorism... Additional information and examples are available in the booklet Understanding Biosecurity: Protecting against the Misuse of Science in Today's World, from the NRC's Board on Life Sciences... Researchers also have a responsibility to reflect on how their work and the knowledge they are generating might be used in the broader society. (National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine,, p. 48) There have been increasing calls to incorporate discussions about the potential security implications of scientific developments into the education of students and practitioners at multiple educational levels (American Association for the Advancement of Science, ; Federation of American Societies in Experimental Biology, ; NRC, )... This was followed in 1976 by the National Institutes of Health–issued Guidelines for Research Involving rDNA Molecules. education about dual use issues provides good opportunities to engage students in conversations about the intersection of science and society... It highlights the global nature of scientific research and can be adapted to the needs of multiple educational settings and multiple groups, from undergraduate students to faculty... The U.S. Department of State asked the IAP: The Global Network of Science AcademiesFormerly the InterAcademy Panel on International Issues; additional information may be found at www.interacademies.net. to organize a workshop about ways to educate life scientists on dual use issues... Two important themes arose from the workshop: First, to engage the life sciences community, these security issues would best be approached in the context of responsible conduct of research, that is, within the wide array of issues that the community addresses to fulfill its responsibilities to society... Second, education about dual use issues would benefit from the insights of the “science of learning,” the growing body of research about how individuals learn at various stages of their lives and careers and the most effective methods for teaching them (e.g., NRC, ; Eshel, )... Given the diversity of fields, interests, and experiences across the life sciences, making dual use issues relevant to all students is a challenge... Further, it is important to reach out to other disciplines that are becoming an increasingly important part of life sciences research—physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering... The committee found that tailoring educational materials to suit the needs of these different groups could help reach wider audiences... Channels through which life scientists already receive exposure to issues of responsible conduct, like biosafety, bioethics, and research ethics, offer the greatest opportunity to reach the largest and most diverse range of students and professionals, the committee found... Thus, rather than trying to cram yet more content into courses, educators need to consider carefully how various types of content can be integrated to improve learning (e.g., Labov and Huddleston, ), contributing to the broad range of learning goals for a course (e.g., Handelsman et al., )... On the basis of the findings and conclusions described briefly above, the committee proposed the following specific actions to improve education on dual use issues:Develop an international open access repository of materials that can be adapted for the local context.

Show MeSH