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Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics.

Sharma G, Parwani AV, Raval JS, Triulzi DJ, Benjamin RJ, Pantanowitz L - J Pathol Inform (2011)

Bottom Line: These demands present significant informatics challenges.Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation.With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathology Informatics, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS.

No MeSH data available.


Standard labeling format of the ISBT 128 barcode. (1) Donation Identification Number; (2) ABO/Rh groups; (3) Collection date; (4) Product code; (5) Expiration date and time; (6) Special testing (optional). (Reproduced with permission from ISBT 128 An Introduction © ICCBBA Inc. http://iccbba.org/uploads/a2/6e/a26e9302a6b32cae265322947c0ef239/ISBT128introbooklet.pdf)
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Figure 3: Standard labeling format of the ISBT 128 barcode. (1) Donation Identification Number; (2) ABO/Rh groups; (3) Collection date; (4) Product code; (5) Expiration date and time; (6) Special testing (optional). (Reproduced with permission from ISBT 128 An Introduction © ICCBBA Inc. http://iccbba.org/uploads/a2/6e/a26e9302a6b32cae265322947c0ef239/ISBT128introbooklet.pdf)

Mentions: Most blood bank LISs have the ability to print and read barcode labels. In the world of transfusion medicine, the two major barcode symbologies are Codabar and ISBT 128.[23] Codabar is a soon to be obsolete linear barcode symbology designed to be accurately read even when printed on dot-matrix printers. With Codabar there are only a limited number of available barcodes. ISBT 128 is a newer internationally standardized bar coding system used for identification, labeling and processing of not only human blood, but also tissue and cellular therapy products. ISBT stands for the International Society of Blood Transfusion and 128 is the barcode symbology used. This system offers many more specific codes. Table 4 shows the data structures provided by ISBT 128.ISBT 128, first published in 1994, was intended to replace the Codabar system.[2425] The ISBT 128 system increases the level of standardization in transfusion medicine. ISBT 128 certainly simplifies the transfer of donor unit testing information between facilities. The Council for Commonality in Blood Banking Automation, Inc. (ICCBBA) is the non-profit company that manages ISBT 128. Since 2006, the FDA requires blood products to bear a machine-readable bar code. Both Codabar and ISBT 128 meet that requirement. Although Codabar is being widely replaced by ISBT 128, blood banks still need to be prepared to handle blood units that may contain older barcodes. For example, frozen products that have a very long shelf life may still have old labels on them. If the LIS cannot handle both types of bar codes, such products may have to be re-labeled. With ISBT 128, each blood product is given a unique donation identification number that includes an assigned collection facility code. This allows every product to be identified and tracked anywhere in the world. Figure 2 illustrates the Unique Donation Identification barcode format. The ISBT 128 barcode allows for more information to be coded into a small space. It also includes an internal check digit to prevent barcode misreads. ISBT 128 also provides a standard labeling format that ensures a consistent layout of product labels with these barcodes [Figure 3].


Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics.

Sharma G, Parwani AV, Raval JS, Triulzi DJ, Benjamin RJ, Pantanowitz L - J Pathol Inform (2011)

Standard labeling format of the ISBT 128 barcode. (1) Donation Identification Number; (2) ABO/Rh groups; (3) Collection date; (4) Product code; (5) Expiration date and time; (6) Special testing (optional). (Reproduced with permission from ISBT 128 An Introduction © ICCBBA Inc. http://iccbba.org/uploads/a2/6e/a26e9302a6b32cae265322947c0ef239/ISBT128introbooklet.pdf)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3046378&req=5

Figure 3: Standard labeling format of the ISBT 128 barcode. (1) Donation Identification Number; (2) ABO/Rh groups; (3) Collection date; (4) Product code; (5) Expiration date and time; (6) Special testing (optional). (Reproduced with permission from ISBT 128 An Introduction © ICCBBA Inc. http://iccbba.org/uploads/a2/6e/a26e9302a6b32cae265322947c0ef239/ISBT128introbooklet.pdf)
Mentions: Most blood bank LISs have the ability to print and read barcode labels. In the world of transfusion medicine, the two major barcode symbologies are Codabar and ISBT 128.[23] Codabar is a soon to be obsolete linear barcode symbology designed to be accurately read even when printed on dot-matrix printers. With Codabar there are only a limited number of available barcodes. ISBT 128 is a newer internationally standardized bar coding system used for identification, labeling and processing of not only human blood, but also tissue and cellular therapy products. ISBT stands for the International Society of Blood Transfusion and 128 is the barcode symbology used. This system offers many more specific codes. Table 4 shows the data structures provided by ISBT 128.ISBT 128, first published in 1994, was intended to replace the Codabar system.[2425] The ISBT 128 system increases the level of standardization in transfusion medicine. ISBT 128 certainly simplifies the transfer of donor unit testing information between facilities. The Council for Commonality in Blood Banking Automation, Inc. (ICCBBA) is the non-profit company that manages ISBT 128. Since 2006, the FDA requires blood products to bear a machine-readable bar code. Both Codabar and ISBT 128 meet that requirement. Although Codabar is being widely replaced by ISBT 128, blood banks still need to be prepared to handle blood units that may contain older barcodes. For example, frozen products that have a very long shelf life may still have old labels on them. If the LIS cannot handle both types of bar codes, such products may have to be re-labeled. With ISBT 128, each blood product is given a unique donation identification number that includes an assigned collection facility code. This allows every product to be identified and tracked anywhere in the world. Figure 2 illustrates the Unique Donation Identification barcode format. The ISBT 128 barcode allows for more information to be coded into a small space. It also includes an internal check digit to prevent barcode misreads. ISBT 128 also provides a standard labeling format that ensures a consistent layout of product labels with these barcodes [Figure 3].

Bottom Line: These demands present significant informatics challenges.Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation.With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathology Informatics, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS.

No MeSH data available.