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Translating evidence into policy for cardiovascular disease control in India.

Gupta R, Guptha S, Joshi R, Xavier D - Health Res Policy Syst (2011)

Bottom Line: These initiatives can have immediate impact in reducing morbidity and mortality.Secondary prevention involves creation of facilities and human resources for optimum acute CVD care and secondary prevention.There is need to integrate various policy makers, develop effective policies and modify healthcare systems for effective delivery of CVD preventive care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur 302017, India. rajeevg@satyam.net.in.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are leading causes of premature mortality in India. Evidence from developed countries shows that mortality from these can be substantially prevented using population-wide and individual-based strategies. Policy initiatives for control of CVD in India have been suggested but evidence of efficacy has emerged only recently. These initiatives can have immediate impact in reducing morbidity and mortality. Of the prevention strategies, primordial involve improvement in socioeconomic status and literacy, adequate healthcare financing and public health insurance, effective national CVD control programme, smoking control policies, legislative control of saturated fats, trans fats, salt and alcohol, and development of facilities for increasing physical activity through better urban planning and school-based and worksite interventions. Primary prevention entails change in medical educational curriculum and improved healthcare delivery for control of CVD risk factors-smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Secondary prevention involves creation of facilities and human resources for optimum acute CVD care and secondary prevention. There is need to integrate various policy makers, develop effective policies and modify healthcare systems for effective delivery of CVD preventive care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Integration of various stake-holders for formulation of policies and implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention and control in India. Ministry of planning should act as nodal point for action and coordinate and integrate activities of various ministries involved in planning, policy development and program implementation. Planning ministry along with ministry of health and its various departments should implement the national cardiovascular disease control program jointly with the state departments of health. There is a need to integrate various maternal and child health programs and communicable diseases programs with non-communicable diseases programs. Also required is a multi-level integration (horizontal and vertical) of various governmental and non-governmental organizations involved in healthcare delivery at the national and state level. SFA saturated fatty acids; TFA trans fatty acids; CVD cardiovascular disease
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Figure 2: Integration of various stake-holders for formulation of policies and implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention and control in India. Ministry of planning should act as nodal point for action and coordinate and integrate activities of various ministries involved in planning, policy development and program implementation. Planning ministry along with ministry of health and its various departments should implement the national cardiovascular disease control program jointly with the state departments of health. There is a need to integrate various maternal and child health programs and communicable diseases programs with non-communicable diseases programs. Also required is a multi-level integration (horizontal and vertical) of various governmental and non-governmental organizations involved in healthcare delivery at the national and state level. SFA saturated fatty acids; TFA trans fatty acids; CVD cardiovascular disease

Mentions: The social issues involved in occurrence of premature CVD and other non-communicable diseases are multiple and include the social gradient, stress, early life events, social exclusion, improper working conditions, lack of social support, addictions including tobacco/alcohol, food scarcity or excess and uneven distribution, lack of proper transport and illiteracy and low educational status [32]. There are macrolevel (governance failure, geopolitics, natural resources decline, economic policies, population growth, demographic trap, etc.) and microlevel (cultural barriers, poverty trap, lack of innovation and savings, absence of trade/business, technological reversal, adverse productivity shock, gender bias, adolescence-related, etc.) factors [30]. Multiple national programs exist in India to improve socioeconomic status of the population ranging from literacy improvement (National Literacy Mission and Right to Education Act) to employment generation (National Rural Employment Guarantee Act) and social security (Women's Health Plan). These policies are directed to the specific social issue or population group but not in context of disease prevention or control. Improving literacy reduces unhealthy behaviours (e.g., smoking) and increases awareness of risk factors [35]. It also promotes adherence to lifestyle and pharmacotherapies for primary and secondary prevention [36]. Both general literacy [37] and health literacy [38] should be part of the National Literacy Mission. Inter-ministerial collaboration is essential for policy implementation on CVD prevention and control (Figure 2) and the Indian National Commission of Macroeconomics and Health which encompasses ministries of health, finance, technical education, human development, youth affairs, sports, women and child development, agriculture, food and civil supplies, industry, commerce and transport is an important step forward [39].


Translating evidence into policy for cardiovascular disease control in India.

Gupta R, Guptha S, Joshi R, Xavier D - Health Res Policy Syst (2011)

Integration of various stake-holders for formulation of policies and implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention and control in India. Ministry of planning should act as nodal point for action and coordinate and integrate activities of various ministries involved in planning, policy development and program implementation. Planning ministry along with ministry of health and its various departments should implement the national cardiovascular disease control program jointly with the state departments of health. There is a need to integrate various maternal and child health programs and communicable diseases programs with non-communicable diseases programs. Also required is a multi-level integration (horizontal and vertical) of various governmental and non-governmental organizations involved in healthcare delivery at the national and state level. SFA saturated fatty acids; TFA trans fatty acids; CVD cardiovascular disease
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3045991&req=5

Figure 2: Integration of various stake-holders for formulation of policies and implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention and control in India. Ministry of planning should act as nodal point for action and coordinate and integrate activities of various ministries involved in planning, policy development and program implementation. Planning ministry along with ministry of health and its various departments should implement the national cardiovascular disease control program jointly with the state departments of health. There is a need to integrate various maternal and child health programs and communicable diseases programs with non-communicable diseases programs. Also required is a multi-level integration (horizontal and vertical) of various governmental and non-governmental organizations involved in healthcare delivery at the national and state level. SFA saturated fatty acids; TFA trans fatty acids; CVD cardiovascular disease
Mentions: The social issues involved in occurrence of premature CVD and other non-communicable diseases are multiple and include the social gradient, stress, early life events, social exclusion, improper working conditions, lack of social support, addictions including tobacco/alcohol, food scarcity or excess and uneven distribution, lack of proper transport and illiteracy and low educational status [32]. There are macrolevel (governance failure, geopolitics, natural resources decline, economic policies, population growth, demographic trap, etc.) and microlevel (cultural barriers, poverty trap, lack of innovation and savings, absence of trade/business, technological reversal, adverse productivity shock, gender bias, adolescence-related, etc.) factors [30]. Multiple national programs exist in India to improve socioeconomic status of the population ranging from literacy improvement (National Literacy Mission and Right to Education Act) to employment generation (National Rural Employment Guarantee Act) and social security (Women's Health Plan). These policies are directed to the specific social issue or population group but not in context of disease prevention or control. Improving literacy reduces unhealthy behaviours (e.g., smoking) and increases awareness of risk factors [35]. It also promotes adherence to lifestyle and pharmacotherapies for primary and secondary prevention [36]. Both general literacy [37] and health literacy [38] should be part of the National Literacy Mission. Inter-ministerial collaboration is essential for policy implementation on CVD prevention and control (Figure 2) and the Indian National Commission of Macroeconomics and Health which encompasses ministries of health, finance, technical education, human development, youth affairs, sports, women and child development, agriculture, food and civil supplies, industry, commerce and transport is an important step forward [39].

Bottom Line: These initiatives can have immediate impact in reducing morbidity and mortality.Secondary prevention involves creation of facilities and human resources for optimum acute CVD care and secondary prevention.There is need to integrate various policy makers, develop effective policies and modify healthcare systems for effective delivery of CVD preventive care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur 302017, India. rajeevg@satyam.net.in.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are leading causes of premature mortality in India. Evidence from developed countries shows that mortality from these can be substantially prevented using population-wide and individual-based strategies. Policy initiatives for control of CVD in India have been suggested but evidence of efficacy has emerged only recently. These initiatives can have immediate impact in reducing morbidity and mortality. Of the prevention strategies, primordial involve improvement in socioeconomic status and literacy, adequate healthcare financing and public health insurance, effective national CVD control programme, smoking control policies, legislative control of saturated fats, trans fats, salt and alcohol, and development of facilities for increasing physical activity through better urban planning and school-based and worksite interventions. Primary prevention entails change in medical educational curriculum and improved healthcare delivery for control of CVD risk factors-smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Secondary prevention involves creation of facilities and human resources for optimum acute CVD care and secondary prevention. There is need to integrate various policy makers, develop effective policies and modify healthcare systems for effective delivery of CVD preventive care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus