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To test or not to test: a cross-sectional survey of the psychosocial determinants of self-testing for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV.

Grispen JE, Ronda G, Dinant GJ, de Vries NK, van der Weijden T - BMC Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions.The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages.Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Gaby.Ronda@maastrichtuniversity.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Although self-tests are increasingly available and widely used, it is not clear whether their use is beneficial to the users, and little is known concerning the determinants of self-test use. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of self-test use for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV, and to examine whether these are similar across these tests. Self-testing was defined as using in-vitro tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a particular disorder, condition, or risk factor for disease.

Methods: A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted among 513 self-testers and 600 non-testers, assessing possible determinants of self-test use. The structured questionnaire was based on the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Protection Motivation Theory. Data were analyzed by means of logistic regression.

Results: The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions. Other psychosocial determinants, e.g. gender, cues to action, perceived barriers, subjective norm, and moral obligation, seemed to be more test-specific.

Conclusions: Psychosocial determinants of self-testing are not identical for all tests and therefore information about self-testing needs to be tailored to a specific test. The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages. Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the questionnaires. This figure depicts the distribution of the participants divided over the questionnaires regarding the three tests under consideration (cholesterol, glucose, and HIV).
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Figure 1: Flowchart of the questionnaires. This figure depicts the distribution of the participants divided over the questionnaires regarding the three tests under consideration (cholesterol, glucose, and HIV).

Mentions: In the current study, two consecutive questionnaires were used. Based on the results of this first questionnaire [1], a questionnaire on the psychosocial determinants of a specific self-test was sent to a selection of self-testers and non-testers. Self-testers received a questionnaire on the test they had performed (e.g. cholesterol test). If multiple self-tests had been performed, a hierarchical selection procedure was applied to determine which test-specific questionnaire was sent, by (1) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed an HIV-test, (2) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed a glucose test and who were not included in (1), and (3) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed a cholesterol test and who were not included in (1) or (2). In addition, a random sample of non-testers was selected based on their level of intention to perform a specific self-test. This resulted in a sample of non-testers equally distributed over the different tests and the various intention categories. Figure 1 displays a schematic overview of the numbers of respondents and non-respondents for each questionnaire.


To test or not to test: a cross-sectional survey of the psychosocial determinants of self-testing for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV.

Grispen JE, Ronda G, Dinant GJ, de Vries NK, van der Weijden T - BMC Public Health (2011)

Flowchart of the questionnaires. This figure depicts the distribution of the participants divided over the questionnaires regarding the three tests under consideration (cholesterol, glucose, and HIV).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3045947&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of the questionnaires. This figure depicts the distribution of the participants divided over the questionnaires regarding the three tests under consideration (cholesterol, glucose, and HIV).
Mentions: In the current study, two consecutive questionnaires were used. Based on the results of this first questionnaire [1], a questionnaire on the psychosocial determinants of a specific self-test was sent to a selection of self-testers and non-testers. Self-testers received a questionnaire on the test they had performed (e.g. cholesterol test). If multiple self-tests had been performed, a hierarchical selection procedure was applied to determine which test-specific questionnaire was sent, by (1) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed an HIV-test, (2) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed a glucose test and who were not included in (1), and (3) selecting all respondents who indicated having performed a cholesterol test and who were not included in (1) or (2). In addition, a random sample of non-testers was selected based on their level of intention to perform a specific self-test. This resulted in a sample of non-testers equally distributed over the different tests and the various intention categories. Figure 1 displays a schematic overview of the numbers of respondents and non-respondents for each questionnaire.

Bottom Line: The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions.The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages.Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Gaby.Ronda@maastrichtuniversity.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Although self-tests are increasingly available and widely used, it is not clear whether their use is beneficial to the users, and little is known concerning the determinants of self-test use. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of self-test use for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV, and to examine whether these are similar across these tests. Self-testing was defined as using in-vitro tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a particular disorder, condition, or risk factor for disease.

Methods: A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted among 513 self-testers and 600 non-testers, assessing possible determinants of self-test use. The structured questionnaire was based on the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Protection Motivation Theory. Data were analyzed by means of logistic regression.

Results: The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions. Other psychosocial determinants, e.g. gender, cues to action, perceived barriers, subjective norm, and moral obligation, seemed to be more test-specific.

Conclusions: Psychosocial determinants of self-testing are not identical for all tests and therefore information about self-testing needs to be tailored to a specific test. The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages. Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus