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The current state of proteomics in GI oncology.

Lin Y, Dynan WS, Lee JR, Zhu ZH, Schade RR - Dig. Dis. Sci. (2008)

Bottom Line: Proteomics refers to the study of the entire set of proteins in a given cell or tissue.In this article, we introduce the commonly adopted proteomic technologies and describe results of a comprehensive review of studies that have applied these technologies to GI oncology, with a particular emphasis on developments in the last 3 years.We discuss reasons why the more than 130 studies to date have had little discernible clinical impact, and we outline steps that may allow proteomics to realize its promise for early detection of disease, monitoring of disease recurrence, and identification of targets for individualized therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Proteomics refers to the study of the entire set of proteins in a given cell or tissue. With the extensive development of protein separation, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics technologies, clinical proteomics has shown its potential as a powerful approach for biomarker discovery, particularly in the area of oncology. More than 130 exploratory studies have defined candidate markers in serum, gastrointestinal (GI) fluids, or cancer tissue. In this article, we introduce the commonly adopted proteomic technologies and describe results of a comprehensive review of studies that have applied these technologies to GI oncology, with a particular emphasis on developments in the last 3 years. We discuss reasons why the more than 130 studies to date have had little discernible clinical impact, and we outline steps that may allow proteomics to realize its promise for early detection of disease, monitoring of disease recurrence, and identification of targets for individualized therapy.

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LCM. a Thermoplastic membrane is placed over a tissue section, b infra-red laser pulse is used to heat a 7.5–30 μm diameter spot, briefly melting the membrane and capturing cells of interest. Heating and cooling of the membrane apparently has no adverse effect [7]. c Cells of interest become attached to the membrane and can be lifted from the slide for downstream analysis. d Application of LCM on colonic epithelium and colon cancer tissue slides
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Fig2: LCM. a Thermoplastic membrane is placed over a tissue section, b infra-red laser pulse is used to heat a 7.5–30 μm diameter spot, briefly melting the membrane and capturing cells of interest. Heating and cooling of the membrane apparently has no adverse effect [7]. c Cells of interest become attached to the membrane and can be lifted from the slide for downstream analysis. d Application of LCM on colonic epithelium and colon cancer tissue slides

Mentions: Tissue proteomics may use material from bulk dissection or laser capture microdissection (LCM). The latter, illustrated in Fig. 2, allows analysis of specific cell types (e.g., cancer cells free of stroma) [7]. Other methods of sample fractionation have also been used to enrich for cancer cells, for example passage through a narrow gauge needle to detach tumor cells from stroma [8]. Tissue proteomics can also be performed using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), where tissue sections are analyzed directly by mass spectrometry, circumventing the need for microdissection or protein extraction (recently reviewed in [9]).Fig. 2


The current state of proteomics in GI oncology.

Lin Y, Dynan WS, Lee JR, Zhu ZH, Schade RR - Dig. Dis. Sci. (2008)

LCM. a Thermoplastic membrane is placed over a tissue section, b infra-red laser pulse is used to heat a 7.5–30 μm diameter spot, briefly melting the membrane and capturing cells of interest. Heating and cooling of the membrane apparently has no adverse effect [7]. c Cells of interest become attached to the membrane and can be lifted from the slide for downstream analysis. d Application of LCM on colonic epithelium and colon cancer tissue slides
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3045515&req=5

Fig2: LCM. a Thermoplastic membrane is placed over a tissue section, b infra-red laser pulse is used to heat a 7.5–30 μm diameter spot, briefly melting the membrane and capturing cells of interest. Heating and cooling of the membrane apparently has no adverse effect [7]. c Cells of interest become attached to the membrane and can be lifted from the slide for downstream analysis. d Application of LCM on colonic epithelium and colon cancer tissue slides
Mentions: Tissue proteomics may use material from bulk dissection or laser capture microdissection (LCM). The latter, illustrated in Fig. 2, allows analysis of specific cell types (e.g., cancer cells free of stroma) [7]. Other methods of sample fractionation have also been used to enrich for cancer cells, for example passage through a narrow gauge needle to detach tumor cells from stroma [8]. Tissue proteomics can also be performed using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), where tissue sections are analyzed directly by mass spectrometry, circumventing the need for microdissection or protein extraction (recently reviewed in [9]).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Proteomics refers to the study of the entire set of proteins in a given cell or tissue.In this article, we introduce the commonly adopted proteomic technologies and describe results of a comprehensive review of studies that have applied these technologies to GI oncology, with a particular emphasis on developments in the last 3 years.We discuss reasons why the more than 130 studies to date have had little discernible clinical impact, and we outline steps that may allow proteomics to realize its promise for early detection of disease, monitoring of disease recurrence, and identification of targets for individualized therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Proteomics refers to the study of the entire set of proteins in a given cell or tissue. With the extensive development of protein separation, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics technologies, clinical proteomics has shown its potential as a powerful approach for biomarker discovery, particularly in the area of oncology. More than 130 exploratory studies have defined candidate markers in serum, gastrointestinal (GI) fluids, or cancer tissue. In this article, we introduce the commonly adopted proteomic technologies and describe results of a comprehensive review of studies that have applied these technologies to GI oncology, with a particular emphasis on developments in the last 3 years. We discuss reasons why the more than 130 studies to date have had little discernible clinical impact, and we outline steps that may allow proteomics to realize its promise for early detection of disease, monitoring of disease recurrence, and identification of targets for individualized therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus