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Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

Castells-Roca L, García-Martínez J, Moreno J, Herrero E, Bellí G, Pérez-Ortín JE - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response.In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found.The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departament de Ciències Mèdiques Bàsiques and IRBLleida, Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Catalunya, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

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Time course of the heat shock experiment.At time 0, cells growing exponentially at 25°C were shifted to 37°C. At the indicated times, aliquots were taken to measure cell concentration, total mRNA per cell (RA) and Pol II transcription rate (TR) per cell (see “Materials and Methods”). The parameters were referred to their respective time 0 values. Bars: standard deviation (n = 3).
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pone-0017272-g001: Time course of the heat shock experiment.At time 0, cells growing exponentially at 25°C were shifted to 37°C. At the indicated times, aliquots were taken to measure cell concentration, total mRNA per cell (RA) and Pol II transcription rate (TR) per cell (see “Materials and Methods”). The parameters were referred to their respective time 0 values. Bars: standard deviation (n = 3).

Mentions: It has been described that S. cerevisiae cells subjected to intense heat shock treatment show a transient growth arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. After a time, cells spontaneously recover and resume cell cycle progression, even under high temperature conditions [19]. To minimize undesirable side effects on the cell cycle, which could disturb the direct effects of heat shock on general transcription and mRNA stability, we employed mild stress conditions that minimally affected exponential growth (cells continue growing, see Fig. 1), but still induced the expression of the genes taking part in the heat shock response. For this purpose, we applied heat stress by shifting exponentially growing cells from 25°C to 37°C, and studied the general transcriptional response of cells under such stress. Other studies involving heat shock employed a broader temperature change.


Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

Castells-Roca L, García-Martínez J, Moreno J, Herrero E, Bellí G, Pérez-Ortín JE - PLoS ONE (2011)

Time course of the heat shock experiment.At time 0, cells growing exponentially at 25°C were shifted to 37°C. At the indicated times, aliquots were taken to measure cell concentration, total mRNA per cell (RA) and Pol II transcription rate (TR) per cell (see “Materials and Methods”). The parameters were referred to their respective time 0 values. Bars: standard deviation (n = 3).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3045430&req=5

pone-0017272-g001: Time course of the heat shock experiment.At time 0, cells growing exponentially at 25°C were shifted to 37°C. At the indicated times, aliquots were taken to measure cell concentration, total mRNA per cell (RA) and Pol II transcription rate (TR) per cell (see “Materials and Methods”). The parameters were referred to their respective time 0 values. Bars: standard deviation (n = 3).
Mentions: It has been described that S. cerevisiae cells subjected to intense heat shock treatment show a transient growth arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. After a time, cells spontaneously recover and resume cell cycle progression, even under high temperature conditions [19]. To minimize undesirable side effects on the cell cycle, which could disturb the direct effects of heat shock on general transcription and mRNA stability, we employed mild stress conditions that minimally affected exponential growth (cells continue growing, see Fig. 1), but still induced the expression of the genes taking part in the heat shock response. For this purpose, we applied heat stress by shifting exponentially growing cells from 25°C to 37°C, and studied the general transcriptional response of cells under such stress. Other studies involving heat shock employed a broader temperature change.

Bottom Line: This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response.In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found.The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departament de Ciències Mèdiques Bàsiques and IRBLleida, Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Catalunya, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus