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Validating the Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI-3): A Comparison Between 561 Female Eating Disorders Patients and 878 Females from the General Population.

Clausen L, Rosenvinge JH, Friborg O, Rokkedal K - J Psychopathol Behav Assess (2010)

Bottom Line: Small but significant differences were found between Danish and international, as well as US norms.Overall, the factor structure was confirmed, the internal consistency of the subscales was satisfactory, the discriminative validity was good, and sensitivity and specificity were excellent.The implications from these results are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) is used worldwide in research and clinical work. The 3(rd) version (EDI-3) has been used in recent research, yet without any independent testing of its psychometric properties. The aim of the present study was twofold: 1) to establish national norms and to compare them with the US and international norms, and 2) to examine the factor structure, the internal consistency, the sensitivity and the specificity of subscale scores. Participants were Danish adult female patients (N = 561) from a specialist treatment centre and a control group (N = 878) was women selected from the Danish Civil Registration system. Small but significant differences were found between Danish and international, as well as US norms. Overall, the factor structure was confirmed, the internal consistency of the subscales was satisfactory, the discriminative validity was good, and sensitivity and specificity were excellent. The implications from these results are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ROC Curves for a Diagnosis of Anorexia. Note. AUC = Percent of total area under ROC curve. A low cut-off score starts in the right upper corner, going down the diagonal
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Fig3: ROC Curves for a Diagnosis of Anorexia. Note. AUC = Percent of total area under ROC curve. A low cut-off score starts in the right upper corner, going down the diagonal

Mentions: ROC curves for all EDI-3 subscales were expressed for a diagnosis of AN, BN and partial AN/BN (see Figs. 3, 4 and 5). In each figure, the subscales with the highest AUC (Area Under Curve) value are listed first. The figures show that the interoceptive deficits subscale is the best predictor across all diagnostic groups, followed by low self-esteem and personal alienation. The bulimia subscale comes sixth overall, but is an excellent predictor of a diagnosis of BN with high sensitivity and specificity estimates. Table 6 provides an overview of sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and diagnostic accuracy of the three best and the worst predictors within each diagnostic group. The cut off score for deciding these estimates was based on the highest value on the Youden’s index. As several of the subscales changed the Youden’s index minimally by either lowering or increasing the cut off, alternative cut off scores are also reported in the direction with the smallest change in the Youden’s index. Generally, increasing the cut off increases the specificity and reduces misclassification, but at the cost of increasing the number of false negatives (patients not detected), which represents a more serious error. Most ROC curves across the diagnostic groups are quite parallel over all levels of cut off scores, but with one notable exception. As expressed in Fig. 3, the subscale of body dissatisfaction is the worst of all subscales in overall diagnostic accuracy of AN. However, at low cut off scores (<6) it definitely is the most sensitive subscale in detecting true cases of AN, though performing poorly with regards to specificity (<.22).Fig. 3


Validating the Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI-3): A Comparison Between 561 Female Eating Disorders Patients and 878 Females from the General Population.

Clausen L, Rosenvinge JH, Friborg O, Rokkedal K - J Psychopathol Behav Assess (2010)

ROC Curves for a Diagnosis of Anorexia. Note. AUC = Percent of total area under ROC curve. A low cut-off score starts in the right upper corner, going down the diagonal
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3044826&req=5

Fig3: ROC Curves for a Diagnosis of Anorexia. Note. AUC = Percent of total area under ROC curve. A low cut-off score starts in the right upper corner, going down the diagonal
Mentions: ROC curves for all EDI-3 subscales were expressed for a diagnosis of AN, BN and partial AN/BN (see Figs. 3, 4 and 5). In each figure, the subscales with the highest AUC (Area Under Curve) value are listed first. The figures show that the interoceptive deficits subscale is the best predictor across all diagnostic groups, followed by low self-esteem and personal alienation. The bulimia subscale comes sixth overall, but is an excellent predictor of a diagnosis of BN with high sensitivity and specificity estimates. Table 6 provides an overview of sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and diagnostic accuracy of the three best and the worst predictors within each diagnostic group. The cut off score for deciding these estimates was based on the highest value on the Youden’s index. As several of the subscales changed the Youden’s index minimally by either lowering or increasing the cut off, alternative cut off scores are also reported in the direction with the smallest change in the Youden’s index. Generally, increasing the cut off increases the specificity and reduces misclassification, but at the cost of increasing the number of false negatives (patients not detected), which represents a more serious error. Most ROC curves across the diagnostic groups are quite parallel over all levels of cut off scores, but with one notable exception. As expressed in Fig. 3, the subscale of body dissatisfaction is the worst of all subscales in overall diagnostic accuracy of AN. However, at low cut off scores (<6) it definitely is the most sensitive subscale in detecting true cases of AN, though performing poorly with regards to specificity (<.22).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Small but significant differences were found between Danish and international, as well as US norms.Overall, the factor structure was confirmed, the internal consistency of the subscales was satisfactory, the discriminative validity was good, and sensitivity and specificity were excellent.The implications from these results are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) is used worldwide in research and clinical work. The 3(rd) version (EDI-3) has been used in recent research, yet without any independent testing of its psychometric properties. The aim of the present study was twofold: 1) to establish national norms and to compare them with the US and international norms, and 2) to examine the factor structure, the internal consistency, the sensitivity and the specificity of subscale scores. Participants were Danish adult female patients (N = 561) from a specialist treatment centre and a control group (N = 878) was women selected from the Danish Civil Registration system. Small but significant differences were found between Danish and international, as well as US norms. Overall, the factor structure was confirmed, the internal consistency of the subscales was satisfactory, the discriminative validity was good, and sensitivity and specificity were excellent. The implications from these results are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus