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I think I could turn and live with animals.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. PMP1@cdc.gov

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It demands heart, brain, soul, body, the entireness of its votary. ” A native of Bordeaux, France, Bonheur was betrothed to art early in life, born into a family of artists... Expelled from traditional schools for rebelliousness by age 12 and refusing to apprentice with a seamstress, another conventional option, she was turned over to her father Raimond Bonheur, a painter, sculptor, and educator, for instruction... Her affinity to animals and her devotion to showing them in their natural environment established her as the foremost animalière of her century, one of the best of all time... Although she was aware of the impressionists, Bonheur did not adopt their style... Her work attracted early attention... She began exhibiting in the Salon at age 19 and continued to exhibit there successfully over many years... She stopped showing sculpture when she became aware of her brother Isidore’s talent in that art... She “did not want to hinder [his] artistic career. ” Her painting Cows and Bulls of the Cantal received a gold medal at the Salon... She traveled to the United States and painted American themes and a famous portrait of Buffalo Bill Cody, who became her friend... Her interest in the United States led to her long connection with Anna Klumpke, an American artist, who after Bonheur’s death, found hundreds of paintings and drawings unseen by anyone in her friend’s studio and pulled together the artist’s (auto)biography... Plowing in Nivernais, on this month’s cover, is a copy by Bonheur of the original government commission, made a year later and likely inspired by The Devil’s Pool, a novel by George Sand (1804–1876)... Her depiction was so accurate that the region was immediately identified when the painting was unveiled. “Oxen that rattle the yoke and chain or halt in the leafy shade, what is that you express in your eyes?” wondered Walt Whitman in his poem Song of Myself, “It seems to me more than all the print I have read in my life. ” In Bonheur’s own “poem,” the massive beasts crisscross the good earth, plowing uphill... He was attracted to their non-humanness, “They do not sweat and whine about their condition, / They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins. ” Furthermore, “Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of owning things, / Not one kneels to another, nor to his kind that lived thousands of years ago, / Not one is respectable or unhappy over the earth. ” Bonheur understood animals... Her unconventional spirit was drawn to their wildness. “I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world. ” But, like the poet, she did not know all we share with them.

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Rosa Bonheur (1822–1899) Plowing in Nivernais (1850) Oil on canvas (133.4 cm × 259.1 cm) SN433 Collection of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a Division of Florida State University
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Fa: Rosa Bonheur (1822–1899) Plowing in Nivernais (1850) Oil on canvas (133.4 cm × 259.1 cm) SN433 Collection of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a Division of Florida State University


I think I could turn and live with animals.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Rosa Bonheur (1822–1899) Plowing in Nivernais (1850) Oil on canvas (133.4 cm × 259.1 cm) SN433 Collection of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a Division of Florida State University
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3044555&req=5

Fa: Rosa Bonheur (1822–1899) Plowing in Nivernais (1850) Oil on canvas (133.4 cm × 259.1 cm) SN433 Collection of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a Division of Florida State University

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. PMP1@cdc.gov

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

It demands heart, brain, soul, body, the entireness of its votary. ” A native of Bordeaux, France, Bonheur was betrothed to art early in life, born into a family of artists... Expelled from traditional schools for rebelliousness by age 12 and refusing to apprentice with a seamstress, another conventional option, she was turned over to her father Raimond Bonheur, a painter, sculptor, and educator, for instruction... Her affinity to animals and her devotion to showing them in their natural environment established her as the foremost animalière of her century, one of the best of all time... Although she was aware of the impressionists, Bonheur did not adopt their style... Her work attracted early attention... She began exhibiting in the Salon at age 19 and continued to exhibit there successfully over many years... She stopped showing sculpture when she became aware of her brother Isidore’s talent in that art... She “did not want to hinder [his] artistic career. ” Her painting Cows and Bulls of the Cantal received a gold medal at the Salon... She traveled to the United States and painted American themes and a famous portrait of Buffalo Bill Cody, who became her friend... Her interest in the United States led to her long connection with Anna Klumpke, an American artist, who after Bonheur’s death, found hundreds of paintings and drawings unseen by anyone in her friend’s studio and pulled together the artist’s (auto)biography... Plowing in Nivernais, on this month’s cover, is a copy by Bonheur of the original government commission, made a year later and likely inspired by The Devil’s Pool, a novel by George Sand (1804–1876)... Her depiction was so accurate that the region was immediately identified when the painting was unveiled. “Oxen that rattle the yoke and chain or halt in the leafy shade, what is that you express in your eyes?” wondered Walt Whitman in his poem Song of Myself, “It seems to me more than all the print I have read in my life. ” In Bonheur’s own “poem,” the massive beasts crisscross the good earth, plowing uphill... He was attracted to their non-humanness, “They do not sweat and whine about their condition, / They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins. ” Furthermore, “Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of owning things, / Not one kneels to another, nor to his kind that lived thousands of years ago, / Not one is respectable or unhappy over the earth. ” Bonheur understood animals... Her unconventional spirit was drawn to their wildness. “I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world. ” But, like the poet, she did not know all we share with them.

Show MeSH