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Dysbindin-1 genotype effects on emotional working memory.

Wolf C, Jackson MC, Kissling C, Thome J, Linden DE - Mol. Psychiatry (2009)

Bottom Line: This suggests effects of variability in DTNBP1 on emotion-specific WM capacity and region-specific task-related brain activation in humans.Synaptic effects of DTNBP1 implicate that altered dopaminergic and/or glutamatergic neurotransmission may be related to the increased WM capacity.The combination of imaging and genetics thus allows us to bridge the gap between the cellular/molecular and systems/behavioral level and extend the cognitive neuroscience approach to a comprehensive biology of cognition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wolfson Centre for Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Bangor University, Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
We combined functional imaging and genetics to investigate the behavioral and neural effects of a dysbindin-1 (DTNBP1) genotype associated with the expression level of this important synaptic protein, which has been implicated in schizophrenia. On a working memory (WM) task for emotional faces, participants with the genotype related to increased expression showed higher WM capacity for happy faces compared with the genotype related to lower expression. Activity in several task-related brain areas with known DTNBP1 expression was increased, including hippocampal, temporal and frontal cortex. Although these increases occurred across emotions, they were mostly observed in areas whose activity correlated with performance for happy faces. This suggests effects of variability in DTNBP1 on emotion-specific WM capacity and region-specific task-related brain activation in humans. Synaptic effects of DTNBP1 implicate that altered dopaminergic and/or glutamatergic neurotransmission may be related to the increased WM capacity. The combination of imaging and genetics thus allows us to bridge the gap between the cellular/molecular and systems/behavioral level and extend the cognitive neuroscience approach to a comprehensive biology of cognition.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of dysbindin-1 genotype on emotional face WM-performancea) The d′prime (accuracy) mean difference between happy and neutral faces was significantly bigger (p < .05, 2-tailed) in the GA group than AA group. Genotype groups differed not significantly for the d′prime difference between angry and neutral faces. Error bars display standard error of the mean. b) The K max mean values (WM-capacity) were higher (p = .05, 2-tailed) for happy but not for angry or neutral faces in participants with GA- compared to AA-genotype. Error bars display standard error of the mean.
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Figure 2: Effect of dysbindin-1 genotype on emotional face WM-performancea) The d′prime (accuracy) mean difference between happy and neutral faces was significantly bigger (p < .05, 2-tailed) in the GA group than AA group. Genotype groups differed not significantly for the d′prime difference between angry and neutral faces. Error bars display standard error of the mean. b) The K max mean values (WM-capacity) were higher (p = .05, 2-tailed) for happy but not for angry or neutral faces in participants with GA- compared to AA-genotype. Error bars display standard error of the mean.

Mentions: When we pooled the angry and happy compared to the neutral condition, there was no significant (p = .44) effect of the DTNBP1 genotype on WM accuracy (d′prime difference). The difference between angry and happy likewise was not affected significantly (p =.14) by the genotype. Both genotype groups showed better WM accuracy for angry compared to neutral faces (d′prime difference angry minus neutral for GA group M = 0.35, SE = 0.22; for AA group M = 0.22, SE = 0.10), but there was no difference of this angry benefit between groups. Conversely, for happy vs. neutral faces only the GA group had significantly better WM accuracy (d′prime difference happy minus neutral for GA group M = 0.38, SE = 0.19; for AA group M = −0.02, SE = 0.09). This group difference was significant at t (54) = 2.08, p < .05, representing a medium effect r = .27 (7% of variance explained) of the DTNBP1 genotype (Figure 2a).


Dysbindin-1 genotype effects on emotional working memory.

Wolf C, Jackson MC, Kissling C, Thome J, Linden DE - Mol. Psychiatry (2009)

Effect of dysbindin-1 genotype on emotional face WM-performancea) The d′prime (accuracy) mean difference between happy and neutral faces was significantly bigger (p < .05, 2-tailed) in the GA group than AA group. Genotype groups differed not significantly for the d′prime difference between angry and neutral faces. Error bars display standard error of the mean. b) The K max mean values (WM-capacity) were higher (p = .05, 2-tailed) for happy but not for angry or neutral faces in participants with GA- compared to AA-genotype. Error bars display standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3044452&req=5

Figure 2: Effect of dysbindin-1 genotype on emotional face WM-performancea) The d′prime (accuracy) mean difference between happy and neutral faces was significantly bigger (p < .05, 2-tailed) in the GA group than AA group. Genotype groups differed not significantly for the d′prime difference between angry and neutral faces. Error bars display standard error of the mean. b) The K max mean values (WM-capacity) were higher (p = .05, 2-tailed) for happy but not for angry or neutral faces in participants with GA- compared to AA-genotype. Error bars display standard error of the mean.
Mentions: When we pooled the angry and happy compared to the neutral condition, there was no significant (p = .44) effect of the DTNBP1 genotype on WM accuracy (d′prime difference). The difference between angry and happy likewise was not affected significantly (p =.14) by the genotype. Both genotype groups showed better WM accuracy for angry compared to neutral faces (d′prime difference angry minus neutral for GA group M = 0.35, SE = 0.22; for AA group M = 0.22, SE = 0.10), but there was no difference of this angry benefit between groups. Conversely, for happy vs. neutral faces only the GA group had significantly better WM accuracy (d′prime difference happy minus neutral for GA group M = 0.38, SE = 0.19; for AA group M = −0.02, SE = 0.09). This group difference was significant at t (54) = 2.08, p < .05, representing a medium effect r = .27 (7% of variance explained) of the DTNBP1 genotype (Figure 2a).

Bottom Line: This suggests effects of variability in DTNBP1 on emotion-specific WM capacity and region-specific task-related brain activation in humans.Synaptic effects of DTNBP1 implicate that altered dopaminergic and/or glutamatergic neurotransmission may be related to the increased WM capacity.The combination of imaging and genetics thus allows us to bridge the gap between the cellular/molecular and systems/behavioral level and extend the cognitive neuroscience approach to a comprehensive biology of cognition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wolfson Centre for Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Bangor University, Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
We combined functional imaging and genetics to investigate the behavioral and neural effects of a dysbindin-1 (DTNBP1) genotype associated with the expression level of this important synaptic protein, which has been implicated in schizophrenia. On a working memory (WM) task for emotional faces, participants with the genotype related to increased expression showed higher WM capacity for happy faces compared with the genotype related to lower expression. Activity in several task-related brain areas with known DTNBP1 expression was increased, including hippocampal, temporal and frontal cortex. Although these increases occurred across emotions, they were mostly observed in areas whose activity correlated with performance for happy faces. This suggests effects of variability in DTNBP1 on emotion-specific WM capacity and region-specific task-related brain activation in humans. Synaptic effects of DTNBP1 implicate that altered dopaminergic and/or glutamatergic neurotransmission may be related to the increased WM capacity. The combination of imaging and genetics thus allows us to bridge the gap between the cellular/molecular and systems/behavioral level and extend the cognitive neuroscience approach to a comprehensive biology of cognition.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus