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Secular trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009 in urban asian Indian adolescents aged 14-17 years.

Gupta DK, Shah P, Misra A, Bharadwaj S, Gulati S, Gupta N, Sharma R, Pandey RM, Goel K - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of obesity increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p<0.01), whereas underweight decreased from 11.3% to 3.9% (p<0.001).Males and privately-funded school children had significantly higher increase in prevalence and risk of being overweight and obese over the three years.In conclusion, this study showed an increasing trend in prevalence of overweight and obesity in urban Asian Indian adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol Diseases Foundation (N-DOC), SDA, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
The present study examines the secular trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban Asian Indian adolescents in New Delhi (North India). The data were derived from cross-sectional sampling of children, 3493 in year 2006 and 4908 in year 2009, aged 14-17 years studying in privately-funded and government-funded schools. Age, gender and Asian Indian-specific cut offs of body mass index (BMI) were used to define overweight and obesity. The prevalence of obesity increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p<0.01), whereas underweight decreased from 11.3% to 3.9% (p<0.001). There was a significantly higher risk of being overweight (OR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15-1.42) and obese (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24-1.66) in year 2009 than 2006, after adjusting for age, gender and type of school. Males and privately-funded school children had significantly higher increase in prevalence and risk of being overweight and obese over the three years. In conclusion, this study showed an increasing trend in prevalence of overweight and obesity in urban Asian Indian adolescents. More specifically, the study showed the association of this increasing trend of overweight and obesity prevalence with male gender and high socio-economic status, calling for an urgent need for immediate and targeted preventive measures.

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Secular Trends in prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009.Caption: Year 2006 (white bars) and 2009 (black bars) included 3493 and 4908 urban Asian Indian adolescents aged 14–17 years, respectively; p value<0.05 was considered significant; Underweight, overweight and obesity were defined as 5th, 85th and 95th percentiles of age and gender specific cut-offs of body mass index in Asian Indians, respectively [23].
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pone-0017221-g001: Secular Trends in prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009.Caption: Year 2006 (white bars) and 2009 (black bars) included 3493 and 4908 urban Asian Indian adolescents aged 14–17 years, respectively; p value<0.05 was considered significant; Underweight, overweight and obesity were defined as 5th, 85th and 95th percentiles of age and gender specific cut-offs of body mass index in Asian Indians, respectively [23].

Mentions: Prevalence of overweight increased non-significantly from 24.2% in 2006 to 25.2% in 2009 (p = 0.280) while over same duration, obesity prevalence increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p = 0.008) (Figure 1). After adjusting for age, gender and type of school, there was a significantly higher risk of being overweight (OR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15 – 1.42; p<0.001) and obese (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24 – 1.66; p<0.001) in year 2009 than 2006 (Table 2).


Secular trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009 in urban asian Indian adolescents aged 14-17 years.

Gupta DK, Shah P, Misra A, Bharadwaj S, Gulati S, Gupta N, Sharma R, Pandey RM, Goel K - PLoS ONE (2011)

Secular Trends in prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009.Caption: Year 2006 (white bars) and 2009 (black bars) included 3493 and 4908 urban Asian Indian adolescents aged 14–17 years, respectively; p value<0.05 was considered significant; Underweight, overweight and obesity were defined as 5th, 85th and 95th percentiles of age and gender specific cut-offs of body mass index in Asian Indians, respectively [23].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3044166&req=5

pone-0017221-g001: Secular Trends in prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity from 2006 to 2009.Caption: Year 2006 (white bars) and 2009 (black bars) included 3493 and 4908 urban Asian Indian adolescents aged 14–17 years, respectively; p value<0.05 was considered significant; Underweight, overweight and obesity were defined as 5th, 85th and 95th percentiles of age and gender specific cut-offs of body mass index in Asian Indians, respectively [23].
Mentions: Prevalence of overweight increased non-significantly from 24.2% in 2006 to 25.2% in 2009 (p = 0.280) while over same duration, obesity prevalence increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p = 0.008) (Figure 1). After adjusting for age, gender and type of school, there was a significantly higher risk of being overweight (OR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15 – 1.42; p<0.001) and obese (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24 – 1.66; p<0.001) in year 2009 than 2006 (Table 2).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of obesity increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p<0.01), whereas underweight decreased from 11.3% to 3.9% (p<0.001).Males and privately-funded school children had significantly higher increase in prevalence and risk of being overweight and obese over the three years.In conclusion, this study showed an increasing trend in prevalence of overweight and obesity in urban Asian Indian adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol Diseases Foundation (N-DOC), SDA, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
The present study examines the secular trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban Asian Indian adolescents in New Delhi (North India). The data were derived from cross-sectional sampling of children, 3493 in year 2006 and 4908 in year 2009, aged 14-17 years studying in privately-funded and government-funded schools. Age, gender and Asian Indian-specific cut offs of body mass index (BMI) were used to define overweight and obesity. The prevalence of obesity increased significantly from 9.8% in 2006 to 11.7% in 2009 (p<0.01), whereas underweight decreased from 11.3% to 3.9% (p<0.001). There was a significantly higher risk of being overweight (OR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15-1.42) and obese (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24-1.66) in year 2009 than 2006, after adjusting for age, gender and type of school. Males and privately-funded school children had significantly higher increase in prevalence and risk of being overweight and obese over the three years. In conclusion, this study showed an increasing trend in prevalence of overweight and obesity in urban Asian Indian adolescents. More specifically, the study showed the association of this increasing trend of overweight and obesity prevalence with male gender and high socio-economic status, calling for an urgent need for immediate and targeted preventive measures.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus