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Differences in knowledge of breast cancer screening among African American, Arab American, and Latina women.

Williams KP, Mabiso A, Todem D, Hammad A, Hill-Ashford Y, Hamade H, Palamisono G, Robinson-Lockett M, Zambrana RE - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

Bottom Line: We used generalized estimating equations to analyze data and to account for family-level and individual correlations.Although African American women knew more about breast cancer screening at the baseline (pretest median scores were 4 for African American, 3 for Arab and 3 for Latina women), all groups significantly increased their knowledge after participating in the breast cancer prevention intervention (posttest median scores were 5 for African American and 4 for Arab and Latina women).Generalized estimating equations models show that Arab and Latina women made the most significant gains in posttest scores (P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, 626 East Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316, USA. karen.williams@ht.msu.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We examined differences in knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with 3 types of breast cancer screening (breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, and mammogram) among African American, Arab, and Latina women.

Methods: Community health workers used a community-based intervention to recruit 341 women (112 Arab, 113 Latina, and 116 African American) in southeastern Michigan to participate in a breast cancer prevention intervention from August through October 2006. Before and after the intervention, women responded to a previously validated 5-item multiple-choice test on breast cancer screening (possible score range: 0 to 5) in their language of preference (English, Spanish, or Arabic). We used generalized estimating equations to analyze data and to account for family-level and individual correlations.

Results: Although African American women knew more about breast cancer screening at the baseline (pretest median scores were 4 for African American, 3 for Arab and 3 for Latina women), all groups significantly increased their knowledge after participating in the breast cancer prevention intervention (posttest median scores were 5 for African American and 4 for Arab and Latina women). Generalized estimating equations models show that Arab and Latina women made the most significant gains in posttest scores (P < .001).

Conclusion: Racial/ethnic differences in knowledge of breast cancer screening highlight the need for tailored information on breast cancer screening for African American, Arab, and Latina women to promote adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of pretest scores by race/ethnicity in the Kin Keeper Cancer Prevention Intervention, Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan, August through October 2006. The pretest evaluated baseline knowledge of breast cancer screening methods. The highest possible score on the pretest was 5.
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Figure 1: Distribution of pretest scores by race/ethnicity in the Kin Keeper Cancer Prevention Intervention, Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan, August through October 2006. The pretest evaluated baseline knowledge of breast cancer screening methods. The highest possible score on the pretest was 5.

Mentions: Sociodemographic characteristics differed significantly by race/ethnicity (Table 1). African American women had higher levels of education, employment, access to health insurance, and income. Approximately 53% of Arab women and 41% of Latina women had not completed high school education or obtained a general equivalency diploma, compared with approximately 3% of African American women (P < .001). Overall, 61% of the women were aged 40 years or older, the age category of women recommended for yearly mammography screening (10). Scores on baseline knowledge test (Figure 1) and postintervention tests (Figure 2) were compared by race/ethnicity. At baseline, African American women had higher knowledge scores; more than 30% obtained a perfect pretest score compared with 9% for Arab women and 5% for Latina women. Mean pretest scores were 3.91 of 5 (SD, 0.92) for African Americans, 3.02 (SD, 1.12) for Latinas, and 2.92 (SD, 1.18) for Arabs. Posttest scores for Latina and Arab women increased significantly (P < .001), as depicted by distribution, which is relatively skewed compared with the pretest distribution in Figure 1. Posttest median scores were 5 for African American women and 4 for Latina and Arab women. The percentage of women in each racial/ethnic group that answered each question correctly varied (Table 2). Question 4, which asked the women to differentiate between types of screening test (self-examination, clinical examination, and mammography) proved to be the most difficult (Table 2) for all racial/ethnic groups.


Differences in knowledge of breast cancer screening among African American, Arab American, and Latina women.

Williams KP, Mabiso A, Todem D, Hammad A, Hill-Ashford Y, Hamade H, Palamisono G, Robinson-Lockett M, Zambrana RE - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

Distribution of pretest scores by race/ethnicity in the Kin Keeper Cancer Prevention Intervention, Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan, August through October 2006. The pretest evaluated baseline knowledge of breast cancer screening methods. The highest possible score on the pretest was 5.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3044031&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of pretest scores by race/ethnicity in the Kin Keeper Cancer Prevention Intervention, Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan, August through October 2006. The pretest evaluated baseline knowledge of breast cancer screening methods. The highest possible score on the pretest was 5.
Mentions: Sociodemographic characteristics differed significantly by race/ethnicity (Table 1). African American women had higher levels of education, employment, access to health insurance, and income. Approximately 53% of Arab women and 41% of Latina women had not completed high school education or obtained a general equivalency diploma, compared with approximately 3% of African American women (P < .001). Overall, 61% of the women were aged 40 years or older, the age category of women recommended for yearly mammography screening (10). Scores on baseline knowledge test (Figure 1) and postintervention tests (Figure 2) were compared by race/ethnicity. At baseline, African American women had higher knowledge scores; more than 30% obtained a perfect pretest score compared with 9% for Arab women and 5% for Latina women. Mean pretest scores were 3.91 of 5 (SD, 0.92) for African Americans, 3.02 (SD, 1.12) for Latinas, and 2.92 (SD, 1.18) for Arabs. Posttest scores for Latina and Arab women increased significantly (P < .001), as depicted by distribution, which is relatively skewed compared with the pretest distribution in Figure 1. Posttest median scores were 5 for African American women and 4 for Latina and Arab women. The percentage of women in each racial/ethnic group that answered each question correctly varied (Table 2). Question 4, which asked the women to differentiate between types of screening test (self-examination, clinical examination, and mammography) proved to be the most difficult (Table 2) for all racial/ethnic groups.

Bottom Line: We used generalized estimating equations to analyze data and to account for family-level and individual correlations.Although African American women knew more about breast cancer screening at the baseline (pretest median scores were 4 for African American, 3 for Arab and 3 for Latina women), all groups significantly increased their knowledge after participating in the breast cancer prevention intervention (posttest median scores were 5 for African American and 4 for Arab and Latina women).Generalized estimating equations models show that Arab and Latina women made the most significant gains in posttest scores (P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, 626 East Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316, USA. karen.williams@ht.msu.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We examined differences in knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with 3 types of breast cancer screening (breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, and mammogram) among African American, Arab, and Latina women.

Methods: Community health workers used a community-based intervention to recruit 341 women (112 Arab, 113 Latina, and 116 African American) in southeastern Michigan to participate in a breast cancer prevention intervention from August through October 2006. Before and after the intervention, women responded to a previously validated 5-item multiple-choice test on breast cancer screening (possible score range: 0 to 5) in their language of preference (English, Spanish, or Arabic). We used generalized estimating equations to analyze data and to account for family-level and individual correlations.

Results: Although African American women knew more about breast cancer screening at the baseline (pretest median scores were 4 for African American, 3 for Arab and 3 for Latina women), all groups significantly increased their knowledge after participating in the breast cancer prevention intervention (posttest median scores were 5 for African American and 4 for Arab and Latina women). Generalized estimating equations models show that Arab and Latina women made the most significant gains in posttest scores (P < .001).

Conclusion: Racial/ethnic differences in knowledge of breast cancer screening highlight the need for tailored information on breast cancer screening for African American, Arab, and Latina women to promote adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus