Limits...
Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery.

Engström M, Forsberg A - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2011)

Bottom Line: Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area.One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss.An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, SU/Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants' relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustrating the core category: wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, starting to feel deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. The process of change is illustrated over a period of 2 years by subcategories describing how the participants dealt with the main concern.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040931&req=5

Figure 0001: Illustrating the core category: wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, starting to feel deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. The process of change is illustrated over a period of 2 years by subcategories describing how the participants dealt with the main concern.

Mentions: A core category, “wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight”, was identified and illuminates the main concern of all the participants when they approached and went through bariatric surgery. The hope for sustainable control was the main reason for surgery. The core category was related to all three categories that illuminated parts of the main concern at different times after surgery and involved all of the participants. It described the steps in the process of change from being burdened by obesity before surgery and hoping for control, to feeling deburdened by surgery one year afterwards, and practising control and a condition involving adjustment and a balanced relationship to food after 2 years, however starting to doubt the control. The basic driving force in the process seemed to be the wish for sustainable control over eating and weight, in turn leading to and resulting in control in several other areas of life. One main strategy throughout the whole process for obtaining and maintaining control was by reflecting on their previous condition of being morbidly obese. Each category was divided into subcategories, the content of which differed in some areas between patients with a successful weight loss and patients who did not succeed as expected to loose weight, as can be seen in Figure 1. In the text, the subcategories are presented in italics and represent strategies of how the informants dealt with the main concern or consequences from the main concern.


Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery.

Engström M, Forsberg A - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2011)

Illustrating the core category: wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, starting to feel deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. The process of change is illustrated over a period of 2 years by subcategories describing how the participants dealt with the main concern.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040931&req=5

Figure 0001: Illustrating the core category: wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, starting to feel deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. The process of change is illustrated over a period of 2 years by subcategories describing how the participants dealt with the main concern.
Mentions: A core category, “wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight”, was identified and illuminates the main concern of all the participants when they approached and went through bariatric surgery. The hope for sustainable control was the main reason for surgery. The core category was related to all three categories that illuminated parts of the main concern at different times after surgery and involved all of the participants. It described the steps in the process of change from being burdened by obesity before surgery and hoping for control, to feeling deburdened by surgery one year afterwards, and practising control and a condition involving adjustment and a balanced relationship to food after 2 years, however starting to doubt the control. The basic driving force in the process seemed to be the wish for sustainable control over eating and weight, in turn leading to and resulting in control in several other areas of life. One main strategy throughout the whole process for obtaining and maintaining control was by reflecting on their previous condition of being morbidly obese. Each category was divided into subcategories, the content of which differed in some areas between patients with a successful weight loss and patients who did not succeed as expected to loose weight, as can be seen in Figure 1. In the text, the subcategories are presented in italics and represent strategies of how the informants dealt with the main concern or consequences from the main concern.

Bottom Line: Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area.One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss.An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, SU/Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants' relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus