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Visual disabilities in children including childhood blindness.

Khandekar R - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: If rational distribution of skilled human resource is not planned visual disabilities will not reduce effectively.Rehabilitation of visually disabled children should be integral part of addressing childhood blindness.All stakeholders including parents of children with visual disabilities should work together to achieve the goals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Control of Non Communicable diseases, Director General of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Oman.

ABSTRACT
We should address visual disabilities in children instead of only the childhood blindness. Diseases related to nutritional, communicable diseases should be addressed through strategies for achieving 'Millennium Development Goals'. Facilities in African countries and countries with populations like India and China must be strengthened to address curable/preventable visual disabilities in children. Even though all efforts are done to strengthen, we will have 0.93 million blind children by 2020. Role of family physicians and paediatricians in trans-disciplinary approach to address visual disabilities in children is very crucial. If rational distribution of skilled human resource is not planned visual disabilities will not reduce effectively. Rehabilitation of visually disabled children should be integral part of addressing childhood blindness. All stakeholders including parents of children with visual disabilities should work together to achieve the goals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Projections of bilateral blind (vision <3/60) among <16 years old children.
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Figure 0001: Projections of bilateral blind (vision <3/60) among <16 years old children.

Mentions: The prevalence of childhood blindness was 0.3 per 1,000 children in industrialised countries and 1.2 per 1,000 children in the developing countries in the year 2000. Accordingly, it was estimated that there were nearly 1.4 million blind children in the world. Each year, an additional 50,000 children become blind and are added to this pool.4 We made an attempt to project the magnitude of blind children up to the year 2030 and for this evidence based information and few assumptions were used (Figure 1). It is a well known fact that 40% of childhood blindness is due to preventable/curable causes.5 While projecting the magnitude by time in a chronic condition, childhood mortality rate should be accounted for. A study in UK suggested that 10% of children with severe visual impairment and blindness die within the first year of detection of their blindness because many them have other potentially life threatening conditions.6 In another study in Sweden, 13% of blind children died due to other systemic conditions.7 Accordingly, world is likely to have 1.6 million blind children if no additional interventions are carried out. If all curable or avoidable causes are addressed, there would still be 0.93 million children with blindness. We have assumed that in next 25 years, no new intervention modalities shall be available to treat today's unavoidable causes (80% of childhood blindness) and we hope that that is not true. Considerable progress has been made in the field of genetics to locate disease related genes for congenital cataract, retinal diseases and conditions linked to cortical blindness.89 Scientists may soon find solutions to treat these conditions.


Visual disabilities in children including childhood blindness.

Khandekar R - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2008)

Projections of bilateral blind (vision <3/60) among <16 years old children.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040917&req=5

Figure 0001: Projections of bilateral blind (vision <3/60) among <16 years old children.
Mentions: The prevalence of childhood blindness was 0.3 per 1,000 children in industrialised countries and 1.2 per 1,000 children in the developing countries in the year 2000. Accordingly, it was estimated that there were nearly 1.4 million blind children in the world. Each year, an additional 50,000 children become blind and are added to this pool.4 We made an attempt to project the magnitude of blind children up to the year 2030 and for this evidence based information and few assumptions were used (Figure 1). It is a well known fact that 40% of childhood blindness is due to preventable/curable causes.5 While projecting the magnitude by time in a chronic condition, childhood mortality rate should be accounted for. A study in UK suggested that 10% of children with severe visual impairment and blindness die within the first year of detection of their blindness because many them have other potentially life threatening conditions.6 In another study in Sweden, 13% of blind children died due to other systemic conditions.7 Accordingly, world is likely to have 1.6 million blind children if no additional interventions are carried out. If all curable or avoidable causes are addressed, there would still be 0.93 million children with blindness. We have assumed that in next 25 years, no new intervention modalities shall be available to treat today's unavoidable causes (80% of childhood blindness) and we hope that that is not true. Considerable progress has been made in the field of genetics to locate disease related genes for congenital cataract, retinal diseases and conditions linked to cortical blindness.89 Scientists may soon find solutions to treat these conditions.

Bottom Line: If rational distribution of skilled human resource is not planned visual disabilities will not reduce effectively.Rehabilitation of visually disabled children should be integral part of addressing childhood blindness.All stakeholders including parents of children with visual disabilities should work together to achieve the goals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Control of Non Communicable diseases, Director General of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Oman.

ABSTRACT
We should address visual disabilities in children instead of only the childhood blindness. Diseases related to nutritional, communicable diseases should be addressed through strategies for achieving 'Millennium Development Goals'. Facilities in African countries and countries with populations like India and China must be strengthened to address curable/preventable visual disabilities in children. Even though all efforts are done to strengthen, we will have 0.93 million blind children by 2020. Role of family physicians and paediatricians in trans-disciplinary approach to address visual disabilities in children is very crucial. If rational distribution of skilled human resource is not planned visual disabilities will not reduce effectively. Rehabilitation of visually disabled children should be integral part of addressing childhood blindness. All stakeholders including parents of children with visual disabilities should work together to achieve the goals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus