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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children: clinical presentations and management.

Aboul Enein HA, Abo Khair AF - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: Idiopathic intracranial is common in adults, particularly obese young women, but also occurs in children and adolescents.This study is a prospective study conducted in the Alexandria Medical School, Egypt, between the periods starting from January 2003 till December 2007.If diagnosed early, visual acuity can be saved with proper management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria Medical School, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Idiopathic intracranial is common in adults, particularly obese young women, but also occurs in children and adolescents.

Aim: Clinical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the pediatric population and how the presenting signs and symptoms may be different from those seen among adult patients.

Results: This study is a prospective study conducted in the Alexandria Medical School, Egypt, between the periods starting from January 2003 till December 2007. Ten patients were included in this study, 9 patients were treated with repeated spinal taps while only one patient necessitated insertion of a theco-peritoneal shunt.

Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension may occur in children as among adults. If diagnosed early, visual acuity can be saved with proper management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Duration of recovery from papilledema in months.
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Figure 0004: Duration of recovery from papilledema in months.

Mentions: Follow up was done for at least 6 months up to 2 years time. Resolution of papilledema occurred rapidly in 9 patients, with a mean of 4.7 months. Resolution of sixth nerve palsy also occurred rapidly in four patients in a mean of 1.6 months. One patient had established strabismus Graphs (1).


Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children: clinical presentations and management.

Aboul Enein HA, Abo Khair AF - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2008)

Duration of recovery from papilledema in months.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040914&req=5

Figure 0004: Duration of recovery from papilledema in months.
Mentions: Follow up was done for at least 6 months up to 2 years time. Resolution of papilledema occurred rapidly in 9 patients, with a mean of 4.7 months. Resolution of sixth nerve palsy also occurred rapidly in four patients in a mean of 1.6 months. One patient had established strabismus Graphs (1).

Bottom Line: Idiopathic intracranial is common in adults, particularly obese young women, but also occurs in children and adolescents.This study is a prospective study conducted in the Alexandria Medical School, Egypt, between the periods starting from January 2003 till December 2007.If diagnosed early, visual acuity can be saved with proper management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria Medical School, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Idiopathic intracranial is common in adults, particularly obese young women, but also occurs in children and adolescents.

Aim: Clinical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the pediatric population and how the presenting signs and symptoms may be different from those seen among adult patients.

Results: This study is a prospective study conducted in the Alexandria Medical School, Egypt, between the periods starting from January 2003 till December 2007. Ten patients were included in this study, 9 patients were treated with repeated spinal taps while only one patient necessitated insertion of a theco-peritoneal shunt.

Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension may occur in children as among adults. If diagnosed early, visual acuity can be saved with proper management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus