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Gene expression profiling of meningiomas: current status after a decade of microarray-based transcriptomic studies.

Aarhus M, Lund-Johansen M, Knappskog PM - Acta Neurochir (Wien) (2011)

Bottom Line: We identified 13 articles matching the inclusion criteria.All studies had been performed during the last decade.Due to lack of consensus on how microarray data are presented, possible general trends found across the studies are difficult to extract.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. mads.aarhus@me.com

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This article provides a review of the transcriptomic expression profiling studies that have been performed on meningiomas so far. We discuss some future prospects and challenges ahead in the field of gene expression profiling.

Methods: We performed a systematic search in the PubMed and EMBASE databases in May 2010 using the following search terms alone or in combination: "meningioma", "microarray analysis", "oligonucleotide array sequence analysis", or "gene expression profiling". Only original research articles in English that had used RNA hybridized to high-resolution microarray chips to generate gene expression profiles were included.

Results: We identified 13 articles matching the inclusion criteria. All studies had been performed during the last decade.

Conclusions: The main results of the studies can be grouped in three categories: (1) several groups have identified meningioma-specific genes and genes associated with the three WHO grades, and the main histological subtypes of grade I meningiomas; (2) one publication has shown that the general transcription profile of samples of all WHO grades differs in vivo and in vitro; (3) one report provides evidence that microarray technology can be used in an automated fashion to classify tumors. Due to lack of consensus on how microarray data are presented, possible general trends found across the studies are difficult to extract. This could obstruct the discovery of important genes and pathways universally involved in meningioma biology.

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Outline of possible application of microarray technology in the diagnostic armamentarium
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Fig3: Outline of possible application of microarray technology in the diagnostic armamentarium

Mentions: Medicine has been transformed by the genomic revolution, and classical population risk assessment and empirical treatment has been challenged by molecular classification and prospects of individualized therapy [1]. With the help of microarray technology novel candidate genes, pathways, and networks may be linked with clinical scenarios, such as treatment response or environmental exposure. Thus, microarrays may be helpful in identifying biomarkers, developing new treatment strategies, and in tumor classification [2] (Fig. 3). Hence, a reasonable application of global gene expression profiling in oncology is to subclassify brain tumors of WHO grade II. Such tumors are generally infiltrative, have low-proliferative activity, tend to recur, and can undergo malignant transformation. Often there is marked clinical and morphological heterogeneity within tumors of this grade. Thus, the categorization of grade II tumors may be more challenging than that of purely benign or malignant entities. With microarray analysis, high- or low-proliferative gene expression signatures, or hyper- or hypo-mutator phenotypes may be revealed. Consequently, signatures indicating high or low risk of recurrence or transformation may be found. Such information may be useful when the addition of adjuvant therapy or follow-up schedule is discussed.Fig. 3


Gene expression profiling of meningiomas: current status after a decade of microarray-based transcriptomic studies.

Aarhus M, Lund-Johansen M, Knappskog PM - Acta Neurochir (Wien) (2011)

Outline of possible application of microarray technology in the diagnostic armamentarium
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040823&req=5

Fig3: Outline of possible application of microarray technology in the diagnostic armamentarium
Mentions: Medicine has been transformed by the genomic revolution, and classical population risk assessment and empirical treatment has been challenged by molecular classification and prospects of individualized therapy [1]. With the help of microarray technology novel candidate genes, pathways, and networks may be linked with clinical scenarios, such as treatment response or environmental exposure. Thus, microarrays may be helpful in identifying biomarkers, developing new treatment strategies, and in tumor classification [2] (Fig. 3). Hence, a reasonable application of global gene expression profiling in oncology is to subclassify brain tumors of WHO grade II. Such tumors are generally infiltrative, have low-proliferative activity, tend to recur, and can undergo malignant transformation. Often there is marked clinical and morphological heterogeneity within tumors of this grade. Thus, the categorization of grade II tumors may be more challenging than that of purely benign or malignant entities. With microarray analysis, high- or low-proliferative gene expression signatures, or hyper- or hypo-mutator phenotypes may be revealed. Consequently, signatures indicating high or low risk of recurrence or transformation may be found. Such information may be useful when the addition of adjuvant therapy or follow-up schedule is discussed.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: We identified 13 articles matching the inclusion criteria.All studies had been performed during the last decade.Due to lack of consensus on how microarray data are presented, possible general trends found across the studies are difficult to extract.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. mads.aarhus@me.com

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This article provides a review of the transcriptomic expression profiling studies that have been performed on meningiomas so far. We discuss some future prospects and challenges ahead in the field of gene expression profiling.

Methods: We performed a systematic search in the PubMed and EMBASE databases in May 2010 using the following search terms alone or in combination: "meningioma", "microarray analysis", "oligonucleotide array sequence analysis", or "gene expression profiling". Only original research articles in English that had used RNA hybridized to high-resolution microarray chips to generate gene expression profiles were included.

Results: We identified 13 articles matching the inclusion criteria. All studies had been performed during the last decade.

Conclusions: The main results of the studies can be grouped in three categories: (1) several groups have identified meningioma-specific genes and genes associated with the three WHO grades, and the main histological subtypes of grade I meningiomas; (2) one publication has shown that the general transcription profile of samples of all WHO grades differs in vivo and in vitro; (3) one report provides evidence that microarray technology can be used in an automated fashion to classify tumors. Due to lack of consensus on how microarray data are presented, possible general trends found across the studies are difficult to extract. This could obstruct the discovery of important genes and pathways universally involved in meningioma biology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus