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Increased prevalence of symptoms of rhinitis but not of asthma between 1990 and 2008 in Swedish adults: comparisons of the ECRHS and GA²LEN surveys.

Bjerg A, Ekerljung L, Middelveld R, Dahlén SE, Forsberg B, Franklin K, Larsson K, Lötvall J, Olafsdóttir IS, Torén K, Lundbäck B, Janson C - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of any wheeze last 12 months decreased from 20% to 16% (p<0.001), and the prevalence of "asthma-related symptoms" was unchanged at 7%.Past and present smoking decreased.The fact that wheeze did not increase despite the significant increment in rhinitis, may at least in part be due to the decrease in smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. anders.bjerg@lung.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: The increase in asthma prevalence until 1990 has been well described. Thereafter, time trends are poorly known, due to the low number of high quality studies. The preferred method for studying time trends in prevalence is repeated surveys of similar populations. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asthma symptoms and their major determinants, rhinitis and smoking, in Swedish young adults in 1990 and 2008.

Methods: In 1990 the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) studied respiratory symptoms, asthma, rhinitis and smoking in a population-based sample (86% participation) in Sweden. In 2008 the same symptom questions were included in the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) survey (60% participation). Smoking questions were however differently worded. The regions (Gothenburg, Uppsala, Umeå) and age interval (20-44 years) surveyed both in 1990 (n = 8,982) and 2008 (n = 9,156) were analysed.

Results: The prevalence of any wheeze last 12 months decreased from 20% to 16% (p<0.001), and the prevalence of "asthma-related symptoms" was unchanged at 7%. However, either having asthma attacks or using asthma medications increased from 6% to 8% (p<0.001), and their major risk factor, rhinitis, increased from 22% to 31%. Past and present smoking decreased.

Conclusion: From 1990 to 2008 the prevalence of obstructive airway symptoms common in asthma did not increase in Swedish young adults. This supports the few available international findings suggesting the previous upward trend in asthma has recently reached a plateau. The fact that wheeze did not increase despite the significant increment in rhinitis, may at least in part be due to the decrease in smoking.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted odds ratios of study year 2008 vs. 1990.Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with adjustment for age (20–27, 28–35, 36–44 years), sex and study centre. 95% confidence intervals are included.
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pone-0016082-g001: Adjusted odds ratios of study year 2008 vs. 1990.Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with adjustment for age (20–27, 28–35, 36–44 years), sex and study centre. 95% confidence intervals are included.

Mentions: The prevalence of any wheeze decreased in all centres from 20.3% (95% CI 19.4–21.1%) to 16.1% (15.4–16.9%), p<0.001 (Table 1). This was most pronounced in Gothenburg, where also wheeze with breathlessness and wheeze without a cold decreased statistically significantly. The prevalence of “asthma-related symptoms” remained at 7% and did not change statistically significantly, p = 0.40. Nocturnal symptoms declined significantly in Gothenburg and were unchanged in Uppsala and Umeå. However, the prevalence of “current asthma” increased from 6.0% (5.5–6.5%) to 8.0% (7.4–8.5%), p<0.001, since both asthma attacks and asthma medication use increased statistically significantly in all three centres. A multivariate model adjusting for age, sex and study centre confirmed these general trends in prevalence (Figure 1). In general, the prevalence trends were similar in men and women (Table 2).


Increased prevalence of symptoms of rhinitis but not of asthma between 1990 and 2008 in Swedish adults: comparisons of the ECRHS and GA²LEN surveys.

Bjerg A, Ekerljung L, Middelveld R, Dahlén SE, Forsberg B, Franklin K, Larsson K, Lötvall J, Olafsdóttir IS, Torén K, Lundbäck B, Janson C - PLoS ONE (2011)

Adjusted odds ratios of study year 2008 vs. 1990.Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with adjustment for age (20–27, 28–35, 36–44 years), sex and study centre. 95% confidence intervals are included.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040758&req=5

pone-0016082-g001: Adjusted odds ratios of study year 2008 vs. 1990.Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with adjustment for age (20–27, 28–35, 36–44 years), sex and study centre. 95% confidence intervals are included.
Mentions: The prevalence of any wheeze decreased in all centres from 20.3% (95% CI 19.4–21.1%) to 16.1% (15.4–16.9%), p<0.001 (Table 1). This was most pronounced in Gothenburg, where also wheeze with breathlessness and wheeze without a cold decreased statistically significantly. The prevalence of “asthma-related symptoms” remained at 7% and did not change statistically significantly, p = 0.40. Nocturnal symptoms declined significantly in Gothenburg and were unchanged in Uppsala and Umeå. However, the prevalence of “current asthma” increased from 6.0% (5.5–6.5%) to 8.0% (7.4–8.5%), p<0.001, since both asthma attacks and asthma medication use increased statistically significantly in all three centres. A multivariate model adjusting for age, sex and study centre confirmed these general trends in prevalence (Figure 1). In general, the prevalence trends were similar in men and women (Table 2).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of any wheeze last 12 months decreased from 20% to 16% (p<0.001), and the prevalence of "asthma-related symptoms" was unchanged at 7%.Past and present smoking decreased.The fact that wheeze did not increase despite the significant increment in rhinitis, may at least in part be due to the decrease in smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. anders.bjerg@lung.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: The increase in asthma prevalence until 1990 has been well described. Thereafter, time trends are poorly known, due to the low number of high quality studies. The preferred method for studying time trends in prevalence is repeated surveys of similar populations. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asthma symptoms and their major determinants, rhinitis and smoking, in Swedish young adults in 1990 and 2008.

Methods: In 1990 the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) studied respiratory symptoms, asthma, rhinitis and smoking in a population-based sample (86% participation) in Sweden. In 2008 the same symptom questions were included in the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) survey (60% participation). Smoking questions were however differently worded. The regions (Gothenburg, Uppsala, Umeå) and age interval (20-44 years) surveyed both in 1990 (n = 8,982) and 2008 (n = 9,156) were analysed.

Results: The prevalence of any wheeze last 12 months decreased from 20% to 16% (p<0.001), and the prevalence of "asthma-related symptoms" was unchanged at 7%. However, either having asthma attacks or using asthma medications increased from 6% to 8% (p<0.001), and their major risk factor, rhinitis, increased from 22% to 31%. Past and present smoking decreased.

Conclusion: From 1990 to 2008 the prevalence of obstructive airway symptoms common in asthma did not increase in Swedish young adults. This supports the few available international findings suggesting the previous upward trend in asthma has recently reached a plateau. The fact that wheeze did not increase despite the significant increment in rhinitis, may at least in part be due to the decrease in smoking.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus