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Quantitative 3-dimensional imaging of murine neointimal and atherosclerotic lesions by optical projection tomography.

Kirkby NS, Low L, Seckl JR, Walker BR, Webb DJ, Hadoke PW - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Planimetric measurements of lesion area correlated well with those made from histological sections subsequently produced from the same vessels (wire-injury: R²  =  0.92; ligation-injury: R²  =  0.89; atherosclerosis: R²  =  0.85), confirming both the accuracy of this methodology and its non-destructive nature.It was also possible to record volumetric measurements of lesion and lumen and these were highly reproducible between scans (coefficient of variation  =  5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79% for wire- and ligation-injury and atherosclerosis, respectively).These data demonstrate the eminent suitability of OPT for imaging of atherosclerotic and neointimal lesion formation, providing a much needed means for the routine 3-dimensional analysis of vascular morphology in studies of this type.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Traditional methods for the analysis of vascular lesion formation are labour intensive to perform - restricting study to 'snapshots' within each vessel. This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of optical projection tomographic (OPT) imaging for the 3-dimensional representation and quantification of intimal lesions in mouse arteries.

Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by wire-insertion or ligation of the mouse femoral artery or administration of an atherogenic diet to apoE-deficient mice. Lesion formation was examined by OPT imaging of autofluorescent emission. Lesions could be clearly identified and distinguished from the underlying vascular wall. Planimetric measurements of lesion area correlated well with those made from histological sections subsequently produced from the same vessels (wire-injury: R²  =  0.92; ligation-injury: R²  =  0.89; atherosclerosis: R²  =  0.85), confirming both the accuracy of this methodology and its non-destructive nature. It was also possible to record volumetric measurements of lesion and lumen and these were highly reproducible between scans (coefficient of variation  =  5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79% for wire- and ligation-injury and atherosclerosis, respectively).

Conclusions: These data demonstrate the eminent suitability of OPT for imaging of atherosclerotic and neointimal lesion formation, providing a much needed means for the routine 3-dimensional analysis of vascular morphology in studies of this type.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Longitudinal profiles of lesion and lumen cross-sectional area in un-injured, ligation- and wire-injured femoral arteries.When cross-sectional area of lesion (red) and lumen (grey) are plotted against distance along the axial length of the femoral artery, the difference in extent of lesion formation between ligation- (b) and wire-injury models (c) is apparent. In both cases, the variability in lesion size that occurs along the length of each vessel is also highlighted.
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pone-0016906-g004: Longitudinal profiles of lesion and lumen cross-sectional area in un-injured, ligation- and wire-injured femoral arteries.When cross-sectional area of lesion (red) and lumen (grey) are plotted against distance along the axial length of the femoral artery, the difference in extent of lesion formation between ligation- (b) and wire-injury models (c) is apparent. In both cases, the variability in lesion size that occurs along the length of each vessel is also highlighted.

Mentions: Whilst 2-dimensional comparisons of OPT and histology provide crucial validation, the greater potential of OPT is in the consideration of 3-dimensional parameters. We established protocols for the volumetric quantification of lesions by OPT. Using these methods, we were able to record lesion volumes in wire- (0.1100±0.0091 mm3; n = 6) and ligation-injured femoral arteries (0.0200±0.0089 mm3; n = 5) and in atherosclerotic brachiocephalic arteries (0.18±0.018 mm3; n = 8). As would be expected from the degree of injury, lesions in wire-injured vessels were significantly greater (p<0.0001 by unpaired t-test) than those in ligation-injured vessels. Coefficients of variation (5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79%, respectively, n = 4) indicated that for all lesion types, measurements were highly reproducible. These data were also expressed as profiles of lesion burden along the length of the vessel (Figure 4) and rendered for dynamic, qualitative evaluation (see Figures S1–S3), in both cases, highlighting the uneven distribution of lesion formation occurring in injured vessels.


Quantitative 3-dimensional imaging of murine neointimal and atherosclerotic lesions by optical projection tomography.

Kirkby NS, Low L, Seckl JR, Walker BR, Webb DJ, Hadoke PW - PLoS ONE (2011)

Longitudinal profiles of lesion and lumen cross-sectional area in un-injured, ligation- and wire-injured femoral arteries.When cross-sectional area of lesion (red) and lumen (grey) are plotted against distance along the axial length of the femoral artery, the difference in extent of lesion formation between ligation- (b) and wire-injury models (c) is apparent. In both cases, the variability in lesion size that occurs along the length of each vessel is also highlighted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3040742&req=5

pone-0016906-g004: Longitudinal profiles of lesion and lumen cross-sectional area in un-injured, ligation- and wire-injured femoral arteries.When cross-sectional area of lesion (red) and lumen (grey) are plotted against distance along the axial length of the femoral artery, the difference in extent of lesion formation between ligation- (b) and wire-injury models (c) is apparent. In both cases, the variability in lesion size that occurs along the length of each vessel is also highlighted.
Mentions: Whilst 2-dimensional comparisons of OPT and histology provide crucial validation, the greater potential of OPT is in the consideration of 3-dimensional parameters. We established protocols for the volumetric quantification of lesions by OPT. Using these methods, we were able to record lesion volumes in wire- (0.1100±0.0091 mm3; n = 6) and ligation-injured femoral arteries (0.0200±0.0089 mm3; n = 5) and in atherosclerotic brachiocephalic arteries (0.18±0.018 mm3; n = 8). As would be expected from the degree of injury, lesions in wire-injured vessels were significantly greater (p<0.0001 by unpaired t-test) than those in ligation-injured vessels. Coefficients of variation (5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79%, respectively, n = 4) indicated that for all lesion types, measurements were highly reproducible. These data were also expressed as profiles of lesion burden along the length of the vessel (Figure 4) and rendered for dynamic, qualitative evaluation (see Figures S1–S3), in both cases, highlighting the uneven distribution of lesion formation occurring in injured vessels.

Bottom Line: Planimetric measurements of lesion area correlated well with those made from histological sections subsequently produced from the same vessels (wire-injury: R²  =  0.92; ligation-injury: R²  =  0.89; atherosclerosis: R²  =  0.85), confirming both the accuracy of this methodology and its non-destructive nature.It was also possible to record volumetric measurements of lesion and lumen and these were highly reproducible between scans (coefficient of variation  =  5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79% for wire- and ligation-injury and atherosclerosis, respectively).These data demonstrate the eminent suitability of OPT for imaging of atherosclerotic and neointimal lesion formation, providing a much needed means for the routine 3-dimensional analysis of vascular morphology in studies of this type.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Traditional methods for the analysis of vascular lesion formation are labour intensive to perform - restricting study to 'snapshots' within each vessel. This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of optical projection tomographic (OPT) imaging for the 3-dimensional representation and quantification of intimal lesions in mouse arteries.

Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by wire-insertion or ligation of the mouse femoral artery or administration of an atherogenic diet to apoE-deficient mice. Lesion formation was examined by OPT imaging of autofluorescent emission. Lesions could be clearly identified and distinguished from the underlying vascular wall. Planimetric measurements of lesion area correlated well with those made from histological sections subsequently produced from the same vessels (wire-injury: R²  =  0.92; ligation-injury: R²  =  0.89; atherosclerosis: R²  =  0.85), confirming both the accuracy of this methodology and its non-destructive nature. It was also possible to record volumetric measurements of lesion and lumen and these were highly reproducible between scans (coefficient of variation  =  5.36%, 11.39% and 4.79% for wire- and ligation-injury and atherosclerosis, respectively).

Conclusions: These data demonstrate the eminent suitability of OPT for imaging of atherosclerotic and neointimal lesion formation, providing a much needed means for the routine 3-dimensional analysis of vascular morphology in studies of this type.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus