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The lupus band test in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

Reich A, Marcinow K, Bialynicki-Birula R - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2011)

Bottom Line: The LBT helps in differentiating LE from other similar skin conditions and may also be helpful in making the diagnosis of SLE in subjects with no specific cutaneous lesions.However, the correct interpretation of this test requires detailed knowledge of the site of the biopsy, deposit components, morphology and brightness of the immunofluorescent band, and other associated serologic findings, as well as the response to treatment.It must be emphasized that LBT is a laboratory procedure that should always be interpreted in conjunction with clinical findings and other serological and immunopathological parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The lupus band test (LBT) is a diagnostic procedure that is used to detect deposits of immunoglobulins and complement components along the dermoepidermal junction in patients with lupus erythematosus (LE). The LBT is positive in about 70%-80% of sun-exposed non-lesional skin specimens obtained from patients with systemic LE (SLE), and in about 55% of SLE cases if sun-protected nonlesional skin is analyzed. In patients with cutaneous LE only, the lesional skin usually shows a positive LBT. The LBT helps in differentiating LE from other similar skin conditions and may also be helpful in making the diagnosis of SLE in subjects with no specific cutaneous lesions. Furthermore, a positive LBT may be applied as a prognostic parameter for LE patients. However, the correct interpretation of this test requires detailed knowledge of the site of the biopsy, deposit components, morphology and brightness of the immunofluorescent band, and other associated serologic findings, as well as the response to treatment. It must be emphasized that LBT is a laboratory procedure that should always be interpreted in conjunction with clinical findings and other serological and immunopathological parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Granular (lumpy) pattern of complement component 3 deposits in sun-protected nonlesional skin in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (original magnification:×400).
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f6-tcrm-7-027: Granular (lumpy) pattern of complement component 3 deposits in sun-protected nonlesional skin in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (original magnification:×400).

Mentions: The immunoglobulin staining pattern in nonlesional LE skin at low magnification is usually described as granular or closely spaced vertically oriented fibrils, and sometimes also as a thick, homogeneous band (Figure 1). The C3 deposits are the most common component, and IgM was the most frequent immunoglobulin class observed in the LBT.16 Remarkably, a sharply defined, thin linear band at the DEJ seen in the pemphigoid should not be considered as a positive LBT (Figure 2).6 Under high power, the patterns of immunoglobulin deposition at the DEJ may be homogenous (Figure 3), fibrillar, stippled (Figure 4), shaggy (Figure 5), lumpy (Figure 6), linear, or thready.6,11 All these patterns are seen in a continuous fashion. A discontinuous or interrupted LBT is less specific and can be seen in a number of other disorders such as actinic keratosis, polymorphic light eruption, and rosacea and in normal sun-exposed skin (Table 1).11 Ultrastructurally, these immunoreactants are deposited on or below lamina densa of the basement membrane.11


The lupus band test in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

Reich A, Marcinow K, Bialynicki-Birula R - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2011)

Granular (lumpy) pattern of complement component 3 deposits in sun-protected nonlesional skin in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (original magnification:×400).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3039011&req=5

f6-tcrm-7-027: Granular (lumpy) pattern of complement component 3 deposits in sun-protected nonlesional skin in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (original magnification:×400).
Mentions: The immunoglobulin staining pattern in nonlesional LE skin at low magnification is usually described as granular or closely spaced vertically oriented fibrils, and sometimes also as a thick, homogeneous band (Figure 1). The C3 deposits are the most common component, and IgM was the most frequent immunoglobulin class observed in the LBT.16 Remarkably, a sharply defined, thin linear band at the DEJ seen in the pemphigoid should not be considered as a positive LBT (Figure 2).6 Under high power, the patterns of immunoglobulin deposition at the DEJ may be homogenous (Figure 3), fibrillar, stippled (Figure 4), shaggy (Figure 5), lumpy (Figure 6), linear, or thready.6,11 All these patterns are seen in a continuous fashion. A discontinuous or interrupted LBT is less specific and can be seen in a number of other disorders such as actinic keratosis, polymorphic light eruption, and rosacea and in normal sun-exposed skin (Table 1).11 Ultrastructurally, these immunoreactants are deposited on or below lamina densa of the basement membrane.11

Bottom Line: The LBT helps in differentiating LE from other similar skin conditions and may also be helpful in making the diagnosis of SLE in subjects with no specific cutaneous lesions.However, the correct interpretation of this test requires detailed knowledge of the site of the biopsy, deposit components, morphology and brightness of the immunofluorescent band, and other associated serologic findings, as well as the response to treatment.It must be emphasized that LBT is a laboratory procedure that should always be interpreted in conjunction with clinical findings and other serological and immunopathological parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The lupus band test (LBT) is a diagnostic procedure that is used to detect deposits of immunoglobulins and complement components along the dermoepidermal junction in patients with lupus erythematosus (LE). The LBT is positive in about 70%-80% of sun-exposed non-lesional skin specimens obtained from patients with systemic LE (SLE), and in about 55% of SLE cases if sun-protected nonlesional skin is analyzed. In patients with cutaneous LE only, the lesional skin usually shows a positive LBT. The LBT helps in differentiating LE from other similar skin conditions and may also be helpful in making the diagnosis of SLE in subjects with no specific cutaneous lesions. Furthermore, a positive LBT may be applied as a prognostic parameter for LE patients. However, the correct interpretation of this test requires detailed knowledge of the site of the biopsy, deposit components, morphology and brightness of the immunofluorescent band, and other associated serologic findings, as well as the response to treatment. It must be emphasized that LBT is a laboratory procedure that should always be interpreted in conjunction with clinical findings and other serological and immunopathological parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus