Limits...
Babesias of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Ireland.

Zintl A, Finnerty EJ, Murphy TM, de Waal T, Gray JS - Vet. Res. (2011)

Bottom Line: Additionally, a B. odocoilei-like parasite was detected in three samples and a babesia that did not match any sequences in the GenBank database was found in five samples.Neither B. capreoli nor B. venatorum (EU1) were found.The present study describes the only deer piroplasm detected so far that shows complete identity with B. divergens, in just over half of the 18S rRNA gene.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Ireland. Jeremy.gray@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
Blood samples were obtained from 38 wild red deer (Cervus elaphus) at two sites in Ireland and subjected to PCR analysis of the 18S rRNA gene followed by sequencing. Two fragments of the 18S rRNA gene were generated by two different PCR protocols and subsequent sequencing suggested that at least six of the deer were infected by a babesia that, in those loci, is indistinguishable from Babesia divergens, an important tick-borne pathogen of cattle and of zoonotic significance. Additionally, a B. odocoilei-like parasite was detected in three samples and a babesia that did not match any sequences in the GenBank database was found in five samples. Neither B. capreoli nor B. venatorum (EU1) were found. There have been several reports of B. divergens occurring in deer species, including red deer, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). However, in view of recent re-sequencing of bovine-origin samples deposited previously in GenBank, it is unlikely that any of these sequences from deer are B. divergens. The present study describes the only deer piroplasm detected so far that shows complete identity with B. divergens, in just over half of the 18S rRNA gene. The entire gene of this deer parasite should be analysed and transmission experiments undertaken before the infectivity of B. divergens for red deer can be confirmed.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic relationships of deer Babesia species (present study in bold) according to the sequence amplified by PCR protocol II (bp loci 1096-1589 in reference sequence AY046576*). The tree was constructed as described for Figure 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037898&req=5

Figure 3: Phylogenetic relationships of deer Babesia species (present study in bold) according to the sequence amplified by PCR protocol II (bp loci 1096-1589 in reference sequence AY046576*). The tree was constructed as described for Figure 2.

Mentions: The initial screen using PCR protocol I revealed that 18 deer carried Babesia spp. infections (26%), with 17 originating from Glenveagh and 1 from Killarney (Table 2). The Babesia species present in these animals were identified by sequence-analysis of fragments amplified using both PCR protocols. Six samples from Glenveagh showed 100% similarity to B. divergens (GenBank AY046576) in both fragments of the 18S rRNA gene (logged in GenBank under accession numbers GU475472 (PCR protocol I) and GU475473 (protocol II)). In a further five isolates one amplicon (resulting either from PCR protocol I or II) showed 100% B. divergens similarity, although the second amplicon could only be identified to genus level. In addition, identical nested PCR products (amplified using protocol I) from three Glenveagh deer samples were 98% similar to B. odocoilei (GenBank AY046577) and have been logged as GU475474. Five products from PCR protocol II (4 from Glenveagh and 1 from Killarney) were also identical to each other but did not closely match any Babesia species in the GenBank database (96% similarity with B. divergens, B. odocoilei and EU1) (accession number GU475475) (Table 2). Figure 2 shows the phylogenetic positions of the amplicons arising from PCR protocol I, which proved to be more discriminating than PCR protocol II. The latter protocol generated amplicons that did not differentiate bovine-origin B. divergens from any of the B. divergens-like species, but showed that the unknown Babesia sp. is clearly separate from B. divergens, B. odocoilei and B. venatorum (Figure 3). The remaining positive PCR amplicons could only be identified to Babesia genus level due to poor sequencing data.


Babesias of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Ireland.

Zintl A, Finnerty EJ, Murphy TM, de Waal T, Gray JS - Vet. Res. (2011)

Phylogenetic relationships of deer Babesia species (present study in bold) according to the sequence amplified by PCR protocol II (bp loci 1096-1589 in reference sequence AY046576*). The tree was constructed as described for Figure 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037898&req=5

Figure 3: Phylogenetic relationships of deer Babesia species (present study in bold) according to the sequence amplified by PCR protocol II (bp loci 1096-1589 in reference sequence AY046576*). The tree was constructed as described for Figure 2.
Mentions: The initial screen using PCR protocol I revealed that 18 deer carried Babesia spp. infections (26%), with 17 originating from Glenveagh and 1 from Killarney (Table 2). The Babesia species present in these animals were identified by sequence-analysis of fragments amplified using both PCR protocols. Six samples from Glenveagh showed 100% similarity to B. divergens (GenBank AY046576) in both fragments of the 18S rRNA gene (logged in GenBank under accession numbers GU475472 (PCR protocol I) and GU475473 (protocol II)). In a further five isolates one amplicon (resulting either from PCR protocol I or II) showed 100% B. divergens similarity, although the second amplicon could only be identified to genus level. In addition, identical nested PCR products (amplified using protocol I) from three Glenveagh deer samples were 98% similar to B. odocoilei (GenBank AY046577) and have been logged as GU475474. Five products from PCR protocol II (4 from Glenveagh and 1 from Killarney) were also identical to each other but did not closely match any Babesia species in the GenBank database (96% similarity with B. divergens, B. odocoilei and EU1) (accession number GU475475) (Table 2). Figure 2 shows the phylogenetic positions of the amplicons arising from PCR protocol I, which proved to be more discriminating than PCR protocol II. The latter protocol generated amplicons that did not differentiate bovine-origin B. divergens from any of the B. divergens-like species, but showed that the unknown Babesia sp. is clearly separate from B. divergens, B. odocoilei and B. venatorum (Figure 3). The remaining positive PCR amplicons could only be identified to Babesia genus level due to poor sequencing data.

Bottom Line: Additionally, a B. odocoilei-like parasite was detected in three samples and a babesia that did not match any sequences in the GenBank database was found in five samples.Neither B. capreoli nor B. venatorum (EU1) were found.The present study describes the only deer piroplasm detected so far that shows complete identity with B. divergens, in just over half of the 18S rRNA gene.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Ireland. Jeremy.gray@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
Blood samples were obtained from 38 wild red deer (Cervus elaphus) at two sites in Ireland and subjected to PCR analysis of the 18S rRNA gene followed by sequencing. Two fragments of the 18S rRNA gene were generated by two different PCR protocols and subsequent sequencing suggested that at least six of the deer were infected by a babesia that, in those loci, is indistinguishable from Babesia divergens, an important tick-borne pathogen of cattle and of zoonotic significance. Additionally, a B. odocoilei-like parasite was detected in three samples and a babesia that did not match any sequences in the GenBank database was found in five samples. Neither B. capreoli nor B. venatorum (EU1) were found. There have been several reports of B. divergens occurring in deer species, including red deer, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). However, in view of recent re-sequencing of bovine-origin samples deposited previously in GenBank, it is unlikely that any of these sequences from deer are B. divergens. The present study describes the only deer piroplasm detected so far that shows complete identity with B. divergens, in just over half of the 18S rRNA gene. The entire gene of this deer parasite should be analysed and transmission experiments undertaken before the infectivity of B. divergens for red deer can be confirmed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus