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Variation of inflammatory dynamics and mediators in primiparous cows after intramammary challenge with Escherichia coli.

Pezeshki A, Stordeur P, Wallemacq H, Schynts F, Stevens M, Boutet P, Peelman LJ, De Spiegeleer B, Duchateau L, Bureau F, Burvenich C - Vet. Res. (2011)

Bottom Line: The infrared images were taken from the caudal view of the udder following challenge with E. coli.Moreover, reduced somatic cell count (SCC), fewer circulating basophils, increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and higher milk sodium and lower milk potassium concentrations were related to systemic disease severity.Although infrared thermography was a successful method for detecting the changes in udder skin surface temperature following intramammary challenge with E. coli, it did not show to be a promising tool for early detection of mastitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Comparative Physiology and Biometrics, Laboratory of Genetics, Drug Quality and Registration Group, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Christian.Burvenich@UGent.be.

ABSTRACT
The objective of the current study was to investigate (i) the outcome of experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis in primiparous cows during early lactation in relation with production of eicosanoids and inflammatory indicators, and (ii) the validity of thermography to evaluate temperature changes on udder skin surface after experimentally induced E. coli mastitis. Nine primiparous Holstein Friesian cows were inoculated 24 ± 6 days (d) after parturition in both left quarters with E. coli P4 serotype O32:H37. Blood and milk samples were collected before and after challenge with E. coli. The infrared images were taken from the caudal view of the udder following challenge with E. coli. No relationship was detected between severity of mastitis and changes of thromboxane B2 (TXB2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4). However, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was related to systemic disease severity during E. coli mastitis. Moreover, reduced somatic cell count (SCC), fewer circulating basophils, increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and higher milk sodium and lower milk potassium concentrations were related to systemic disease severity. The thermal camera was capable of detecting 2-3 °C temperature changes on udder skin surface of cows inoculated with E. coli. Peak of udder skin temperature occurred after peak of rectal temperature and appearance of local signs of induced E. coli mastitis. Although infrared thermography was a successful method for detecting the changes in udder skin surface temperature following intramammary challenge with E. coli, it did not show to be a promising tool for early detection of mastitis.

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Rectal temperature (lozenge) and udder skin temperature of the infected (square) and control quarter (triangle). Swelling of infected quarters: +mild, ++moderate. See legend of Figure 2 for more details.
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Figure 3: Rectal temperature (lozenge) and udder skin temperature of the infected (square) and control quarter (triangle). Swelling of infected quarters: +mild, ++moderate. See legend of Figure 2 for more details.

Mentions: The temperature of the udder skin on the infected quarter was significantly higher than that of the control quarter (P = 0.04). The mean udder temperature of infected quarters was increased from 3 PIH onward (Figure 3). However, skin temperature of the control quarters was increased from 9 PIH onward only. A peak of udder skin temperature in infected and control quarters occurred after the peak of rectal temperature (12 vs. 9 PIH, respectively). The temperature of udder skin at 12 PIH for both infected and uninfected quarters was significantly higher compared to 0 PIH (P = 0.02 and P = 0.009, respectively). There were no significant differences between udder skin temperatures at other time points when compared to 0 PIH. Thereafter, the udder skin temperature returned to normal in both quarters.


Variation of inflammatory dynamics and mediators in primiparous cows after intramammary challenge with Escherichia coli.

Pezeshki A, Stordeur P, Wallemacq H, Schynts F, Stevens M, Boutet P, Peelman LJ, De Spiegeleer B, Duchateau L, Bureau F, Burvenich C - Vet. Res. (2011)

Rectal temperature (lozenge) and udder skin temperature of the infected (square) and control quarter (triangle). Swelling of infected quarters: +mild, ++moderate. See legend of Figure 2 for more details.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037895&req=5

Figure 3: Rectal temperature (lozenge) and udder skin temperature of the infected (square) and control quarter (triangle). Swelling of infected quarters: +mild, ++moderate. See legend of Figure 2 for more details.
Mentions: The temperature of the udder skin on the infected quarter was significantly higher than that of the control quarter (P = 0.04). The mean udder temperature of infected quarters was increased from 3 PIH onward (Figure 3). However, skin temperature of the control quarters was increased from 9 PIH onward only. A peak of udder skin temperature in infected and control quarters occurred after the peak of rectal temperature (12 vs. 9 PIH, respectively). The temperature of udder skin at 12 PIH for both infected and uninfected quarters was significantly higher compared to 0 PIH (P = 0.02 and P = 0.009, respectively). There were no significant differences between udder skin temperatures at other time points when compared to 0 PIH. Thereafter, the udder skin temperature returned to normal in both quarters.

Bottom Line: The infrared images were taken from the caudal view of the udder following challenge with E. coli.Moreover, reduced somatic cell count (SCC), fewer circulating basophils, increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and higher milk sodium and lower milk potassium concentrations were related to systemic disease severity.Although infrared thermography was a successful method for detecting the changes in udder skin surface temperature following intramammary challenge with E. coli, it did not show to be a promising tool for early detection of mastitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Comparative Physiology and Biometrics, Laboratory of Genetics, Drug Quality and Registration Group, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Christian.Burvenich@UGent.be.

ABSTRACT
The objective of the current study was to investigate (i) the outcome of experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis in primiparous cows during early lactation in relation with production of eicosanoids and inflammatory indicators, and (ii) the validity of thermography to evaluate temperature changes on udder skin surface after experimentally induced E. coli mastitis. Nine primiparous Holstein Friesian cows were inoculated 24 ± 6 days (d) after parturition in both left quarters with E. coli P4 serotype O32:H37. Blood and milk samples were collected before and after challenge with E. coli. The infrared images were taken from the caudal view of the udder following challenge with E. coli. No relationship was detected between severity of mastitis and changes of thromboxane B2 (TXB2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4). However, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was related to systemic disease severity during E. coli mastitis. Moreover, reduced somatic cell count (SCC), fewer circulating basophils, increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and higher milk sodium and lower milk potassium concentrations were related to systemic disease severity. The thermal camera was capable of detecting 2-3 °C temperature changes on udder skin surface of cows inoculated with E. coli. Peak of udder skin temperature occurred after peak of rectal temperature and appearance of local signs of induced E. coli mastitis. Although infrared thermography was a successful method for detecting the changes in udder skin surface temperature following intramammary challenge with E. coli, it did not show to be a promising tool for early detection of mastitis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus