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An uncommon cause of seizures in children living in developed countries: neurocysticercosis--a case report.

Raffaldi I, Scolfaro C, Mignone F, Aguzzi S, Denegri F, Tovo PA - Ital J Pediatr (2011)

Bottom Line: Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while in Europe, especially in Italy, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anectodal.We report the case of a 6 year old boy, born and lived for four years in Cameroon, who presented a right emiconvulsion.This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with non febrile seizures, mainly if he emigrated from an area of high prevalence or if he had long-term stay in endemic regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Turin, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Piazza Polonia 94, 10126, Turin, Italy. ire_raffaldi@yahoo.it

ABSTRACT
Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while in Europe, especially in Italy, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anectodal. We report the case of a 6 year old boy, born and lived for four years in Cameroon, who presented a right emiconvulsion. The diagnosis was neurocysticercosis. This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with non febrile seizures, mainly if he emigrated from an area of high prevalence or if he had long-term stay in endemic regions.

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Brain MRI before specific treatment. (a) axial T2-weighted MRI shows an alteration in left frontal-parietal cortex attributing to vasogenic edema (b) coronal T1-weighted post contrast MRI shows a little ring-enhancing lesion in left frontal cortex.
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Figure 1: Brain MRI before specific treatment. (a) axial T2-weighted MRI shows an alteration in left frontal-parietal cortex attributing to vasogenic edema (b) coronal T1-weighted post contrast MRI shows a little ring-enhancing lesion in left frontal cortex.

Mentions: He was directly admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and he was successfully treated with Phenobarbital (5 mg/Kg i.v.). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed two cystic round lesions located one in the right lentiform nucleus and one in the left frontal-parietal lobe (Figure 1). In the following 36 hours the EEG displayed an improvement of child's cerebral conditions with the disappearance of the asymmetric slow activity reported previously. After 48 hours the child was transferred to our Department. Blood exams revealed high eosinophil cell count (720 cells/μL) and Ig E levels (217 UI/ml). Western blot assay detected specific antibodies against cysticercus (LDBIO DIAGNOSTICS, Lyon, France). Therefore the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was made and the appropriated therapy was started: the child received, orally, albendazole (15 mg/Kg/day) in two divided doses and dexamethasone (2 mg/day) for eight days.


An uncommon cause of seizures in children living in developed countries: neurocysticercosis--a case report.

Raffaldi I, Scolfaro C, Mignone F, Aguzzi S, Denegri F, Tovo PA - Ital J Pediatr (2011)

Brain MRI before specific treatment. (a) axial T2-weighted MRI shows an alteration in left frontal-parietal cortex attributing to vasogenic edema (b) coronal T1-weighted post contrast MRI shows a little ring-enhancing lesion in left frontal cortex.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037856&req=5

Figure 1: Brain MRI before specific treatment. (a) axial T2-weighted MRI shows an alteration in left frontal-parietal cortex attributing to vasogenic edema (b) coronal T1-weighted post contrast MRI shows a little ring-enhancing lesion in left frontal cortex.
Mentions: He was directly admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and he was successfully treated with Phenobarbital (5 mg/Kg i.v.). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed two cystic round lesions located one in the right lentiform nucleus and one in the left frontal-parietal lobe (Figure 1). In the following 36 hours the EEG displayed an improvement of child's cerebral conditions with the disappearance of the asymmetric slow activity reported previously. After 48 hours the child was transferred to our Department. Blood exams revealed high eosinophil cell count (720 cells/μL) and Ig E levels (217 UI/ml). Western blot assay detected specific antibodies against cysticercus (LDBIO DIAGNOSTICS, Lyon, France). Therefore the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was made and the appropriated therapy was started: the child received, orally, albendazole (15 mg/Kg/day) in two divided doses and dexamethasone (2 mg/day) for eight days.

Bottom Line: Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while in Europe, especially in Italy, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anectodal.We report the case of a 6 year old boy, born and lived for four years in Cameroon, who presented a right emiconvulsion.This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with non febrile seizures, mainly if he emigrated from an area of high prevalence or if he had long-term stay in endemic regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Turin, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Piazza Polonia 94, 10126, Turin, Italy. ire_raffaldi@yahoo.it

ABSTRACT
Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while in Europe, especially in Italy, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anectodal. We report the case of a 6 year old boy, born and lived for four years in Cameroon, who presented a right emiconvulsion. The diagnosis was neurocysticercosis. This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with non febrile seizures, mainly if he emigrated from an area of high prevalence or if he had long-term stay in endemic regions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus