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In-situ sorbent amendments: a new direction in contaminated sediment management.

Ghosh U, Luthy RG, Cornelissen G, Werner D, Menzie CA - Environ. Sci. Technol. (2011)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA. ughosh@umbc.edu

ABSTRACT

The accumulation of harmful and persistent organic moleculesin soils and sediment is a major environmental concern. Removal byphysical means such as riverine, lacustrine, or marine dredging canbe prohibitively difficult, expensive, and may not ultimately proveeffective. An alternative is to locally change the geochemistry tostabilize and sequester the contaminants and render them biologicallyunavailable. Ghosh et al. report on pilot projects to determine whetheractivated carbon would be so useful. Their Feature concludes withwhat more needs to be done to minimize anthropogenic chemical blightsin soil and sediments.

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Simulateddecrease in the average aqueous PCB-101 concentration for HuntersPoint sediment amended with 3.4% by weight activated carbon with amean particle size of 150 μm. The simulation of the heterogeneousdistribution assumes 1 cm spherical volumes of activated carbon freesediment surrounded by activated carbon rich sediment.
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fig3: Simulateddecrease in the average aqueous PCB-101 concentration for HuntersPoint sediment amended with 3.4% by weight activated carbon with amean particle size of 150 μm. The simulation of the heterogeneousdistribution assumes 1 cm spherical volumes of activated carbon freesediment surrounded by activated carbon rich sediment.

Mentions: Typical AC dosing at the various test sites was 2−5% byweight of dry sediment (matching the native organic carbon contentof sediment) in the top 10−30 cm of sediment. Even under poormixing conditions, mass transfer of PCBs to a passive sampler in sedimentwas greatly reduced in the presence of AC.(29) Homogeniety of AC distribution and mixing regime will influencethe time required to observe full treatment benefits under field conditions(Figure 3). Small-scale heterogeneity of sorbentdistribution at the scale of 1 cm will extend the time required, whereasporewater movement by advection or mechanical dispersion and/or bioturbationwill enhance contact between sediment and the added sorbents.


In-situ sorbent amendments: a new direction in contaminated sediment management.

Ghosh U, Luthy RG, Cornelissen G, Werner D, Menzie CA - Environ. Sci. Technol. (2011)

Simulateddecrease in the average aqueous PCB-101 concentration for HuntersPoint sediment amended with 3.4% by weight activated carbon with amean particle size of 150 μm. The simulation of the heterogeneousdistribution assumes 1 cm spherical volumes of activated carbon freesediment surrounded by activated carbon rich sediment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037809&req=5

fig3: Simulateddecrease in the average aqueous PCB-101 concentration for HuntersPoint sediment amended with 3.4% by weight activated carbon with amean particle size of 150 μm. The simulation of the heterogeneousdistribution assumes 1 cm spherical volumes of activated carbon freesediment surrounded by activated carbon rich sediment.
Mentions: Typical AC dosing at the various test sites was 2−5% byweight of dry sediment (matching the native organic carbon contentof sediment) in the top 10−30 cm of sediment. Even under poormixing conditions, mass transfer of PCBs to a passive sampler in sedimentwas greatly reduced in the presence of AC.(29) Homogeniety of AC distribution and mixing regime will influencethe time required to observe full treatment benefits under field conditions(Figure 3). Small-scale heterogeneity of sorbentdistribution at the scale of 1 cm will extend the time required, whereasporewater movement by advection or mechanical dispersion and/or bioturbationwill enhance contact between sediment and the added sorbents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA. ughosh@umbc.edu

ABSTRACT

The accumulation of harmful and persistent organic moleculesin soils and sediment is a major environmental concern. Removal byphysical means such as riverine, lacustrine, or marine dredging canbe prohibitively difficult, expensive, and may not ultimately proveeffective. An alternative is to locally change the geochemistry tostabilize and sequester the contaminants and render them biologicallyunavailable. Ghosh et al. report on pilot projects to determine whetheractivated carbon would be so useful. Their Feature concludes withwhat more needs to be done to minimize anthropogenic chemical blightsin soil and sediments.

Show MeSH